Category Archives: Uncategorized

2020-21 Hearst Multimedia Digital News or Enterprise Story Competition Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Digital News or Enterprise Story Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

There were 74 entries from 44 schools submitted in the third multimedia competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Hope Davison, from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Hope receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “What’s next, Japan?”
Hope also qualifies to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Multimedia Championship which will be held this June.

The other top finalists are:

Second place, $2,000 award, Victor Prieto, University of Florida
Third place, $1,500 award, Lydia Schweickart, Western Kentucky University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Hazel Cramer,  University of Montana
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, David M. Horowitz, San Francisco State University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:

Sixth Place, certificate, Alexandra Accorsi, Pennsylvania State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Andrew Dundas, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Eighth Place, certificate, Harika Maddala, San Francisco State University
Ninth Place, certificate, Alex Maxwell, Western Kentucky University
Tenth Place, certificate, Elizabeth Pulver, Stony Brook University

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is in first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first three multimedia competitions.
 They are followed by: Western Kentucky University; San Francisco State University; University of Florida; Stony Brook University; Syracuse University; University of Missouri; Elon University; Arizona State University; University of Maryland (tie); University of Montana (tie).

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the all four multimedia competitions in May.

The multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today, VA; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios, WA.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 61st year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Personality/Profile Writing Winners Announced

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college Personality/Profile Writing have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program.

There were 114 profile writing entries submitted from 64 universities in our fourth writing competition of this
academic year.

First Place has been awarded to  George Stoia, a spring 2020 graduate from the University of Oklahoma. George receives a $3,000 scholarship for the article “Courageous: The Maggie Nichols Story” published in the 
OU Daily.

University of Oklahoma’s College of Journalism & Mass Communication will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Per program guidelines, George is not eligible to participate in the 2021 Championships as he is a spring 2020 graduate.

Second-place winner Melissa Manno, a junior from Pennsylvania State University, receives a $2,000
scholarship and qualifies for the Writing Championship in June 2021 for her article “The Inmates’ Reality” published in The Lion’s Roar.

Other scholarship winners are:


Michaela Mulligan, University of Florida, third place, $1,500 scholarship

Lilly St. Angelo, Indiana University, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship

Sadie Brown, University of North Texas, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship

The sixth-through-tenth place winners earn Hearst certificates:

Jake Santo, Arizona State University, sixth place, certificate

Olivia Wales, Texas Christian University, seventh place, certificate

Matt Courson, Middle Tennessee State University, eighth place, certificate

Rachel Bernstein, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, ninth place, certificate

Jamie Landers, Arizona State University, tenth place, certificate

Syracuse University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first four of five writing competitions held this year.
They are followed by: Indiana University; Arizona State University; Drake University; University of Florida; University of Oklahoma; Pennsylvania State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Missouri;
University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of all five writing competitions in June. The top three winning schools will earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Journalist-at-large, ESPN’s The Undefeated; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor/Content, Houston
Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and
four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2020-21 Hearst Television News Winners Announced

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college Television News have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program.The winners were selected from 77 entries submitted from 48 schools nationwide in the second television competition of this academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Katelyn Keenehan, a senior from Arizona State University. Katelyn wins a $3,000 scholarship and automatically qualifies for the National Television Championship, which will be held in June 2021.

The second through fifth-place finalists are:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Tyler Manion, Arizona State University
Third Place, $1,500 award, Joseline Donoso, University of Florida
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Chris O’Brien, University of Florida
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Alyssa Jackson, University of Missouri

These finalists, along with the four finalists from the first television competition, qualify to participate in a semi-final round. From that semi-final round, four finalists will be selected to compete in the National Championships, along with the two first place winners in TV and the writing, audio, television and multimedia finalists.

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth through tenth-place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Sam Britten, Michigan State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Ian Gilmour, Michigan State University
Eighth Place, certificate, Addison Albert, Pennsylvania State University
Ninth Place, certificate, John Webb, University of Idaho
Tenth Place, certificate, Ward Jolles, University of South Carolina

The University of Florida has won the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated
student points from the radio and two television competitions held this year.

It is followed by: Arizona State University; Michigan State University; University of Missouri; Syracuse University; University of Texas, Austin; Kent State University (tie); Pennsylvania State University (tie); Murray State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The television judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television, NY; Holly Quan,
Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio, CA; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensem & Rovitto LLC, PA.

The 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends annually.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass
Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Photojournalism II Winners Announced

San Francisco – The Hearst Foundation announces the winners in the Photojournalism Picture Story/Series
Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. The winners in the second photo competition of the year were selected from 91 entries submitted from 54 universities nationwide.

First place has been awarded to Angelica Edwards, a junior from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Angelica receives a $3,000 scholarship award and qualifies for the 2021 Photojournalism Championship which will take place this June.

Second place, $2,000 scholarship, is awarded to Michael Blackshire from Western Kentucky University. Michael is a summer 2020 graduate and, per program guidelines, is not eligible for the semi-final round.

The other top winners in this competition, along with the top finalists from the Photo I competition, will submit additional photographs for the semi-final round of judging in April. Four finalists will be selected from that round to compete in the National Championships, along with writing, audio, television and multimedia finalists.

The qualifiers for the semi-final round:

Third Place, $1,500 award, Sam Mallon, Western Kentucky University

Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Austin Johnson, University of Oregon

Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Isaac Ritchey, Central Michigan University

Sixth Place, certificate, Leslie Ostronic, Ohio University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The seventh-through-tenth place finalists are:

Seventh Place, certificate, Rebecca Slezak, Ball State University

Eighth Place, certificate, Julia Nikhinson, University of Maryland

Ninth Place, certificate, Eloise Kelsey, San Francisco State University

Tenth Place, certificate, Laura Bilson, Ohio University

Western Kentucky University has won the Intercollegiate Photojournalism Competition with the highest
accumulated student points from the two photo competitions held this year.

It is followed by: 
Ohio University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Montana; University of Kentucky; Ball State University (tie); Pennsylvania State University (tie); University of Oregon; University of Florida; Syracuse University.

The top three Intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The photojournalism judges are: Marcia Allert, Director of Visual Journalism, The Dallas Morning News; Luis Rios, Director of Photography, San Antonio Express-News; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program added photojournalism to the competitions in 1970. The program also
includes five writing, one audio, two television, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.


The 61st Annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation.  103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst
competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Multimedia Innovative Storytelling & Audience Engagement Competition Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Innovative Storytelling & Audience
Engagement Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 49 entries from 34 schools submitted in the second multimedia competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Alex Kim, from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Alex receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “Superhuman.” Alex is a spring 2020 graduate and, per program guidelines, is not eligible to participate in the Championship.

Second-place winner, Kate DeBlasis, from the University of Maryland, earns a $2,000 award and qualifies to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Multimedia Championship which will be held this June.

The other top finalists are:

Third place, $1,500 award, Sam Mallon, Western Kentucky University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Chris Kohley,  Western Kentucky University

Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Marjorie Anne Foster, Elon University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:

Sixth Place, certificate, Matthew Westmoreland, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Seventh Place, certificate, Christian Cangiano, Stony Brook University

Eighth Place, certificate, Denisse Machado Taboada, Florida International University
Ninth Place, certificate, Jennifer Alvarez, Arizona State University
Tenth Place, certificate, Sam Ogozalek, Syracuse University

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is in first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first two multimedia competitions.
They are followed by: Western Kentucky University; University of Missouri; Syracuse University; San Francisco State University; Stony Brook University; University of Maryland; University of Florida; New York University; Elon University.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the all four multimedia competitions in May.

The multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA;
Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today, VA; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios, WA.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 61st year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are
eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Sports Writing Winners Announced

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college sports writing have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 103 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate. There were 123 sports writing entries submitted from 67 universities in our third writing competition of this academic year.

First Place has been awarded to  Caleb Coffman, a senior from Indiana University. Caleb receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning article titled “The General’s Shadow: How author John Feinstein survived a year with Bob Knight ” published in the Indiana Daily Student. Caleb also qualifies to participate in the 2021 Hearst National Writing Championship this June.

Indiana University’s Department of Journalism will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Other scholarship winners are:
Luke Mullin, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Allison Ingrum, Syracuse University, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Natalie Parks, University of Kentucky, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Michael Gutnick, Arizona State University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship

The sixth-through-tenth place winners earn Hearst certificates:
Max Baker, University of Missouri, sixth place, certificate
Parth Upadhyaya, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, seventh place, certificate
Adam Cole, University of Missouri, eighth place, certificate
Drake Keeler, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, ninth place, certificate
Joe Levin, University of Texas at Austin, tenth place, certificate

Syracuse University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first three of five writing competitions held this year.

They are followed by: Drake University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Indiana University, University of Kentucky, Arizona State University, University of Florida, Brigham Young University.

The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of all five writing competitions in June. The top three winning schools will earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Journalist-at-large, ESPN’s The Undefeated; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor, Houston Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and
four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

# # #

2021 Hearst Audio News & Features Winners Announced

San Francisco – The Hearst Foundation has announced the finalists selected in the 2020-2021 Journalism Awards Program’s Audio News and Features competition. The top radio winners qualify for the National
Championship, held this June, along with qualifying television, writing, photojournalism and multimedia finalists. 55 entries from 36 universities were submitted in this competition.

The top audio winners who qualify for the National Championship:
First Place, $3,000 award, Caleb Suggs, University of Memphis
Second Place, $2,000 award, Jaeha Joshua Chang, University of Southern California
Third Place, $1,500 award, Natalie Saenz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Charlotte Ix, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Emma VandenEinde, Arizona State University

The schools of all award-winning finalists receive matching grants.
Audio Finalists:
Sixth Place, Certificate, Hannah Bullard, Murray State University
Seventh Place, Certificate, Tina Turner, University of Alabama
Eighth Place, Certificate, Anthony Montalto, University of Florida
Ninth Place, Certificate, Eli Finkelson, Hofstra University
Tenth Place, Certificate, Dominique Lavigne, University of Texas at Austin

University of Florida has placed first in the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the Audio and TV 1 Competitions.
They are followed by: University of Texas at Austin; Michigan State University; Syracuse University; Murray State University; Arizona State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Howard University (tie); University of Memphis (tie); University of Nebraska-Lincoln (tie).
Final intercollegiate scores will be announced after the TV 2 competition has been finalized. The top three winning schools earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The audio competition judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television, NY; Holly Quan, Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio, CA; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensem & Rovitto LLC, PA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program also includes five writing, one audio, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.

The 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.

There are 103 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Explanatory Reporting Winners Announced

HEARST EXPLANATORY REPORTING WINNERS ANNOUNCED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college explanatory reporting have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 103 undergraduate journalism
programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

107 explanatory reporting entries from 60 universities were received in this competition.

First Place has been awarded to Riley Haun, from the University of Idaho. Riley receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning article titled “‘The bottom has just dropped out’: As insect populations plummet, scientists
wonder why.” published in the Spokeman.com. Riley also qualifies to participate in the 2021 Hearst National
Writing Championship this June.

University of Idaho’s School of Journalism will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Other scholarship winners are:

Angela Roberts, University of Maryland, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Drew Wayland, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Bailey Vandiver, University of Kentucky, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Ramishah Maruf, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship
Ashley Flaws, Drake University, sixth place, certificate
Emily Kelleher, Syracuse University, seventh place, certificate
Erika Peters, Stony Brook University, eighth place, certificate
Adrianna Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, ninth place, certificate
Claire Colby, University of Missouri, tenth place, certificate

Drake University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first two writing competitions this year.
They are followed by: Syracuse University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Florida; University of Oregon (tie); University of Oklahoma (tie);
Stony Brook University; University of Idaho; Brigham Young University; University of Iowa.

The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the five writing competitions in June. The top three winning schools in each category will earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor, Houston Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2020-21 Hearst Multimedia Narrative Storytelling Winners Announced

HEARST MULTIMEDIA NARRATIVE STORYTELLING WINNERS ANNOUNCED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Narrative Storytelling Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 90 entries from 51 schools submitted in the first of four multimedia competitions held this academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Nash Consing, a senior from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Nash will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece “To My Future Employer.” Nash also qualifies to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Multimedia Championship which will be held this June.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Jing Feng, New York University
Third place, $1,500 award, Raj Paul Ghusar, San Francisco State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Jacob Moscovitch, University of Missouri
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Madeline Kraft, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Silas Walker, Western Kentucky University
Seventh Place, certificate, Mackenzie Behm, University of Florida
Eighth Place, certificate, Elsie Stormberg, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Ninth Place, certificate, Michelle Hanks, Western Kentucky University
Tenth Place, certificate, Sadie Brown, University of North Texas

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is in first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first of four multimedia competitions.
They are followed by: Western Kentucky University; University of Missouri; New York University; San Francisco State University; University of Florida; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of North Texas; Syracuse University; California State University, Northridge.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the all four multimedia competitions in May.

The multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today, VA; Meredith Hogan, Founder and Director, Blue Heron Media, WA.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 61st year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Television Features Winners Announced

HEARST TELEVISION FEATURES WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – The William Randolph Hearst Foundation announces the top 10 winners in 2020-2021 Television Features Competition in the 61st Annual Hearst
Journalism Awards Program, in which 103 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

The winners were selected from 97 entries submitted from 63 schools nationwide in the first of two television competitions.

First Place has been awarded to Joe Friehofer, a senior from Michigan State University. Joe wins a $3,000
scholarship and automatically qualifies for the National Television Championship which will be held in June 2021.

The other top ten finalists and their awards are:

Second Place, $2,000 award, Annabel Thorpe, University of Missouri
Third Place, $1,500 award, Luke Hajdasz, University of Connecticut
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Sydney Wicker, Colorado State University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Piper Cassetto, Murray State University
Sixth Place, certificate, Chris O’Brien, University of Florida
Seventh Place, certificate, Joseph Carson, Brigham Young University
Eighth Place, certificate, Marco Ramirez, University of Texas at Austin
Ninth Place, certificate, Jack Hirsh, Pennsylvania State University
Tenth Place, certificate, Gianna DaPra, Kent State University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The following four finalists qualify for the semi-final round:
Annabel Thorpe, University of Missouri
Luke Hajdasz, University of Connecticut
Sydney Wicker, Colorado State University
Piper Cassetto, Murray State University

These finalists along with the top four from the second television competition will be chosen to participate in the semi-final round. From that competition, four finalists will compete in the National Broadcast Championships.

Michigan State University is in first place in the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest
accumulated student points from the first of three broadcast competitions.

It is followed by: University of Florida; University of Texas at Austin; University of Missouri; University of Connecticut; Kent State University; Howard University (tie); Colorado State University (tie); Syracuse University (tie); Murray State University (tie).

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively, and will be announced after the completion of the audio and second television competition in April.

The television judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television, NY; Holly Quan, Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio, CA; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensem & Rovitto LLC, PA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program also includes five writing, one audio, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.

The 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. There are 103 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.