2018-19 Hearst Multimedia Enterprise Reporting Winners Named

HEARST MULTIMEDIA III/ENTERPRISE REPORTING WINNERS NAMED 

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia/Enterprise Reporting Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 72 entries from 41 schools submitted in the third
multimedia competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to Skyler Ballard, a senior from Western Kentucky University. Skyler will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “En Muerto En Vida” published in Wkupj.com. Skyler also qualifies to participate in the National Multimedia Championship which will be held in San Francisco, June 1-6, 2019.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Kristin E. Stitzlein, University of South Carolina
Third place, $1,500 award, Sam Reiser, Pennsylvania State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Gabriella Parsons, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Daria Kadovik, Arizona State University
The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Alex Kormann, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Seventh Place, certificate, Darian Woehr, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Eighth Place, certificate, Jiakai Lou, University of Montana
Ninth Place, certificate, Brook Joyner, Western Kentucky University
Tenth Place, certificate, Nicole Harvey, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill placed first in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the three multimedia competitions held this year.   It is followed by: University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Western Kentucky University, University of Florida; Arizona State University;
Pennsylvania State University; University of Montana; University of Missouri (tie); University of South Carolina (tie); Brigham Young University (tie); San Francisco State University (tie).

The final top three intercollegiate winners will be announced in May after the completion of the last multimedia competition.  They will receive $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively at the Intercollegiate Awards Ceremony during the National Championship this June in San Francisco.

The Multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant, CA; Brian Storm, Founder & Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 59th year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The
program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Television News Winners Named

HEARST TELEVISION TWO/NEWS WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Television News Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. The winners were selected from 76 entries submitted from 42 schools nationwide.

First Place has been awarded to David Jones from University of Florida. David wins a $3,000 scholarship and automatically qualifies for the National Television Championship, which will be held in San Francisco this June.

The other top four winners in this competition, along with the top finalists from Television Competition One/Features will submit additional entries for a semi-final round of judging. Finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the Championship, along with writing, photo, radio and multimedia finalists.

The top four semi-finalists:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Storme Jones, University of Oklahoma
Third Place, $1,500 award, Mary Grace Scully, University Florida
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Bryce Newberry, Arizona State University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Emily Wakeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

Sixth-through tenth place winners:
Sixth Place, certificate, Gabriella Bachara, Arizona State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Austin Kleber, University of Maryland
Eighth Place, certificate, Blake Sammann, University of Missouri
Ninth Place, certificate, Sydney Persing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Tenth Place, certificate, Brandon Pelter, Pennsylvania State University

University of Florida has won the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the one radio and two television competitions.

It is followed by: Arizona State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Missouri; Pennsylvania State University; Syracuse University; University of Maryland; University of Texas, Austin; Elon University; University of Nevada-Reno.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. These awards will be presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation in San Francisco this June.

The television judges are: Julie Chin, News Director, KNX Radio, Los Angeles, CA; Lloyd Siegel, former Vice President of News Partnerships, NBC News, NY; and Fred Young, retired Senior Vice President of News, Hearst Television Inc., Yardley, PA.

The 59th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, added broadcast news to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, one radio, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Sports Writing Winners Named

2018-19 HEARST SPORTS WRITING WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college sports writing were announced today in the 59th annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 104 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

There were 135 entries from 76 schools received in the third writing competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Cody Nagel, from University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Cody receives a $3,000
scholarship for his winning article titled “Why Are Female Athletes Some of the Best Students on Campus?”
published in Hailvarsity.com.

Cody was a spring 2018 graduate, and per program guidelines is not eligible to participate in the 2019
Championship. Second-place winner Sarah Verschoor, Indiana University, advances to participate in the National Writing Championship held in San Francisco this June. Sarah receives a $2,000 scholarship for her winning story “A racist trustee’s name was taken off an IU gym. Supporters want Bill Garrett’s name on it to right history”
published in the Indiana Daily Student.

The journalism departments of all scholarship winners receive matching grants.

Third-to-tenth place winners:

Jed May, University of Georgia, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Ryan Clarke, Arizona State University, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Patrick Burns, Pennsylvania State University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship
Anthony Poisal, Ohio University, sixth place, certificate of merit
Andy Kostka, University of Maryland, seventh place, certificate of merit
Ross Burkhart, University of Texas at Austin, eighth place, certificate of merit
Haley Kim, Syracuse University, ninth place, certificate of merit
Hannah Hoffmeister, University of Missouri, tenth place, certificate of merit

Indiana University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first three writing competitions of the year. They are followed by: Pennsylvania State University;
Arizona State University; University of Oregon; Auburn University (tie); University of Maryland (tie);
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; University of Missouri; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
University of Nebraska-Lincoln (tie); Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (tie).

The final intercollegiate writing winners will be announced after the completion of the five writing competitions and presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation in San Francisco this June.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, The San Francisco Chronicle; Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; and David Zeeck, former President and Publisher, The News Tribune, WA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one radio, two
television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2018-19 Hearst Photojournalism II Winners Named

HEARST PHOTOJOURNALISM COMPETITION II WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Photojournalism II– Picture Story/Series Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

The winners were selected from 86 entries submitted from 51 schools nationwide. In a recent addition to the program guidelines, the first-place winner automatically qualifies for the National Photojournalism Championship which will be held in San Francisco next June. The other top winners in this competition, along with the top finalists from the photo I competition, will submit additional photographs for the semi-final round of judging in April.
Finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Championships, along with writing, radio, television and multimedia finalists.

First Place has been awarded to Alex Kormann from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alex wins a $3,000 scholarship and qualifies for the National Championships.

Other top winners who qualify for the semi-final round:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Joel Angel Juárez, San Francisco State University
Third Place, $1,500 award, Liz Moughon, Ohio University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Cheyenne Thorpe, University of Oregon
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, James Wooldridge, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Michelle Hanks, Western Kentucky University
Seventh Place, certificate, Michael Blackshire, Western Kentucky University
Eighth Place, certificate, Nic Antaya, Michigan State University
Ninth Place, certificate, Chamberlain Smith, University of Georgia
Tenth Place, certificate, Blake Nissen, Ohio University

Western Kentucky University has won the 2018-19 Intercollegiate Photojournalism Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the two photo competitions held this year.

It is followed by: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ohio University; San Francisco State University;
University of Iowa; Arizona State University; Ball State University; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of Oregon; University of Kentucky. The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The photojournalism judges are: Erin Lubin, Freelance Photographer, San Francisco; Dai Sugano, Staff Photographer/Senior Multimedia Editor, The Mercury News; and Jose Luis Rios, Director of Photography,
San Antonio Express-News.

The 59th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, added photojournalism to the competitions in 1970. The program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Multimedia II Winners Named

HEARST MULTIMEDIA II/NEWS WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia II/News Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 52 entries from 31 schools submitted in the second multimedia competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to Kathryn Ziesig, from Western Kentucky University. Kathryn will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “Defying All Odds” published in Wkupj.com. Kathryn also qualifies to participate in the National Multimedia Championship which will be held in San Francisco, June 1-6, 2019.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Mackenzie Behm, University of Florida
Third place, $1,500 award, Sabrina Sommer, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Elsie Stormberg, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Rikki Devlin, University of Montana
The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Samantha Gebers, Arizona State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Darian Woehr, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Eighth Place, certificate, Courtney Staton, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ninth Place, certificate, Cat Gloria, University of Florida
Tenth Place, certificate, Rebecca Spiess, Arizona State University

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill placed first in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first two multimedia competitions.

It is followed by: University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of Florida; Western Kentucky University;
Arizona State University; University of Montana; Pennsylvania State University; University of Missouri;
Kent State University; San Francisco State University.

The top three intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the four multimedia competitions. They will receive $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively at the Intercollegiate Awards Ceremony during the Championship this June in San Francisco.

The Multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant, CA; Brian Storm, Founder & Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 59th year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Radio Winners Named

HEARST RADIO WINNERS NAMED

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation has announced the finalists selected in the 2018-2019 Journalism Awards Program’s radio news and features competition. The top five radio winners qualify for the National Radio Championship this June, along with qualifying television, writing, photojournalism and multimedia finalists.

The top five radio winners who qualify for the National Championship:
First Place, $3,000 award, Megan Cain, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, $2,000 award, Brighton McConnell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Third Place, $1,500 award, Austin Westfall, Arizona State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Dolores Hinckley, University of Florida
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Aviva Okeson-Haberman, University of Missouri

The schools of all award-winning finalists receive matching grants.

Radio Finalists:
Sixth Place, Certificate, Elias Imadali, University of Montana
Seventh Place, Certificate, Maddie Biertempfel, Pennsylvania State University
Eighth Place, Certificate, Karina Gonzalez, University of Nevada, Reno
Ninth Place, Certificate, Victor Onimole, University of New Mexico
Tenth Place, Certificate, Haley Butler, University of Texas at Austin

After the TV 1 and Radio competitions, University of Florida has placed first in the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated student points. They are followed by: University of Missouri; Arizona State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pennsylvania State University; Syracuse University; University of Texas at Austin; University of Nevada, Reno; University of Montana (tie); University of New Mexico (tie).

Final intercollegiate scores will be announced after TV2 has been finalized. The top three winning schools earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The radio judges are: Julie Chin, News Director, KNX Radio, CA; Lloyd Siegel, former Vice President of News Partnerships, NBC News, NY; and Fred Young, retired Senior Vice President of News, Hearst Television Inc., PA.

The 59th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, added broadcast news to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two television, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.

104 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Enterprise Writing Winners Named

2018-19 HEARST ENTERPRISE WRITING WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college enterprise writing were announced today in the 59th annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 104 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.
There were 129 entries from 72 schools received in the second writing competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Anna Spoerre, from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Anna receives a $3,000 scholarship for her winning article titled “University hires chancellor’s daughter, son-in-law” published in The Daily Egyptian.

Anna was a spring 2018 graduate and per program guidelines, is not eligible to participate in the 2019 Championship. Second-place winner Michael Tobin, University of Oregon, advances to participate in the National Championship held in San Francisco this June.

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale’s School of Journalism will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Second-to-tenth place winners:
Michael Tobin, University of Oregon, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Matt Neuman, University of Montana, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Chris McCrory, Arizona State University, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Rebecca Liebson, Stony Brook University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship

Sixth-through-tenth place winners receiving certificates of merit are:
Lydia Gerike, Indiana University, sixth place
Emma Collins, Western Kentucky University, seventh place
Alison Kuznitz, Pennsylvania State University, eighth place
Eduardo Medina, Auburn University, ninth place
Rick Childress, University of Kentucky, tenth place

Indiana University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first two writing competitions of the year. They are followed by: Arizona State University; University of Oregon; Pennsylvania State University; Auburn University; University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Southern Illinois University, Carbondale; University of Kentucky; University of Montana.

The final intercollegiate writing winners will be announced after the completion of the five writing competitions and presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation in San Francisco this June.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, The San Francisco Chronicle; Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; and David Zeeck, former President and Publisher, The News Tribune, WA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one radio, two television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2018-19 Hearst Multimedia I Winners Named

HEARST MULTIMEDIA I/FEATURES WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia I/Narrative Storytelling – Features Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 74 entries from 46 schools submitted in the first multimedia competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to Abby Cantrell, from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Abby will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “The Story Keeper” published in Catawba Calling. Abby also qualifies to participate in the National Multimedia Championship which will be held in San Francisco, June 2-6, 2019.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Jason Armond, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Third place, $1,500 award, Katerina Procyk, Pennsylvania State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Isaiah Somanas, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Kenneth Ferriera, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth through tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Mackenzie Behm, University of Florida
Seventh Place, certificate, Charlene Santiago, Arizona State University
Eighth Place, certificate, Vivian Acosta, Florida International University
Ninth Place, certificate, Rayna Sims, University of Missouri
Tenth Place, certificate, Ida Marie Odgaard, Western Kentucky University

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill placed first in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first of four multimedia competitions. It is followed by: University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Pennsylvania State University; Western Kentucky University; University of Florida; Kent State University; Arizona State University; San Francisco State University (tie); Florida International University (tie); University of North Texas. The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The Multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Photography and Video, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant, CA; Brian Storm, Founder & Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 59th year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Television I Winners Named

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Television Features Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

The winners were selected from 107 entries submitted from 60 schools nationwide. The first-place winner
qualifies for the National Television Championship which will be held in San Francisco next June. The other top winners in this competition, along with the top finalists in the next television competition will submit additional entries for a semi-final round of judging. Four finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the
Championship, along with writing, photo, radio and multimedia finalists.

First Place has been awarded to Grace King from University of Florida. Grace wins a $3,000 scholarship and qualifies for the Championship.

The top ten finalists and their awards are:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Lydia Nusbaum, University of Missouri
Third Place, $1,500 award, Matt Lively, Arizona State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Meredith Sheldon, University Florida
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Claire Going, Pennsylvania State University
Sixth Place, certificate, Claire Kopsky, University of Missouri
Seventh Place, certificate, Tom Austen, Syracuse University
Eighth Place, certificate, Payton Walker, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ninth Place, certificate, Lillian Donahue, Arizona State University
Tenth Place, certificate, Kristen Rary, University of Georgia
The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The four finalists in bold qualify for the semi-final round. The remaining finalists in the top five graduated in spring 2018, and per program guidelines, may not participate in the semi-finals.

University of Florida is in first place in the intercollegiate broadcast competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first television competition.

It is followed by: University of Missouri; Arizona State University; Syracuse University; Pennsylvania State
University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Baylor University; Michigan State University; University of Maryland; University of Georgia. The final intercollegiate broadcast winners are announced after the completion of the radio competition and the second television competition.
The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The television judges are: Julie Chin, News Director, KNX Radio, Los Angeles, CA; Lloyd Siegel, former Vice President of News Partnerships, NBC News, NY; and Fred Young, retired Senior Vice President of News, Hearst Television Inc., Yardley, PA.

The 59th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, added broadcast news to the competitions in 1988.
The program also includes five writing, one radio, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 universities of the Association of Schools of
Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Photojournalism I Winners Named

HEARST PHOTOJOURNALISM WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Photojournalism I– Features and News Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

The winners were selected from 128 entries submitted from 77 schools nationwide. In a recent addition to the program guidelines, the first-place winner automatically qualifies for the National Photojournalism Championship which will be held in San Francisco next June. The other top winners in this competition, along with the top
finalists in the next photo competition, will submit additional photographs for the semi-final round of judging next April.

Finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the National Championship, along with writing, radio,
television and multimedia finalists.

First Place has been awarded to Gabriel Scarlett from Western Kentucky University.
Gabriel wins a $3,000 scholarship and qualifies for the National Photojournalism Championship.

Other top winners who qualify for the semi-final round:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Becca Slezak, Ball State University
Third Place, $1,500 award, Josephine Norris, Central Michigan University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Jason Armond, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, James Year, University of Iowa *
Sixth Place, certificate, Brian Muñoz, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale

* James Year is a spring 2018 graduate and per the program guidelines, may not participate in the semi-finals.

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The seventh- through-tenth place finalists are:
Seventh Place, certificate, Arden Barnes, University of Kentucky
Eighth Place, certificate, Alex Kormann, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ninth Place, certificate, Michael Blackshire, Western Kentucky University
Tenth Place, certificate, Joel Angel Juárez, San Francisco State University

Western Kentucky University is in first place in the Intercollegiate Photojournalism Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first of two photo competitions.

It is followed by: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill: Ball State University; Ohio University; Central Michigan University; University of Iowa; University of Kentucky; Southern Illinois University, Carbondale; Arizona State
University; San Francisco State University. The final Intercollegiate winners are announced in April. The top three
intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The photojournalism judges are: Erin Lubin, freelance photographer, San Francisco; Dai Sugano, Staff
Photographer/Senior Multimedia Editor, The Mercury News; and Jose Luis Rios, Director of Photography,
San Antonio Express-News.

The 59th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, added photojournalism to the competitions in 1970. The
program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 universities of the Association of Schools of
Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.