2019 Hearst National Championship Winners Announced

2019 HEARST NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS ANNOUNCED

San Francisco – Winning college journalists in the National Writing, Photojournalism, Radio, Television and Multimedia Championships were announced on June 5, 2019 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, during the final awards ceremony at the Westin St. Francis in San Francisco.

The Hearst Championships are the culmination of the 2018 – 2019 Journalism Awards Program, which were held in 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs.

From June 1 through June 5, 29 finalists – all winners from the 14 monthly competitions – participated in the 59th annual Hearst Championships in San Francisco where they demonstrated their writing, photography, radio, television and multimedia skills in rigorous on-the-spot assignments. The assignments were chosen by media professionals who judged the finalists’ work throughout the year and at the Championships.

The following are the first, second and third-place winners and the scholarships they received:

NATIONAL WRITING CHAMPIONSHIP
First Place, James Crabtree-Hannigan, University of Maryland, $10,000 award
Second Place, Caroline Anders, Indiana University, $7,500 award
Third Place, Lydia Gerike, Indiana University, $5,000 award

NATIONAL PHOTOJOURNALISM CHAMPIONSHIP
First Place, Alex Kormann, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $10,000 award
Second Place, Josie Norris, Central Michigan University, $7,500 award
Third Place, James Wooldridge, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, $5,000 award

NATIONAL RADIO BROADCAST NEWS CHAMPIONSHIP
First Place, Dolores Hinckley, University of Florida, $10,000 award
Second Place, Megan Cain, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $7,500 award
Third Place, Brighton McConnell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $5,000 award

NATIONAL TELEVISION BROADCAST NEWS CHAMPIONSHIP
First Place, David J. Jones, University of Florida, $10,000 award
Second Place, Bryce Newberry, Arizona State University, $7,500 award
Third Place, Matt Lively, Arizona State University, $5,000 award

NATIONAL MULTIMEDIA CHAMPIONSHIP
First Place, Darian Woehr, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $10,000 award
Second Place, Skyler Ballard, Western Kentucky University, $7,500 award
Third Place, Abby Cantrell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $5,000 award

Finalists in the Championship are:

Five finalists in the Writing Championship, who will each receive $1,500 scholarships
(listed in alphabetical order):
Laurel Demkovich, Indiana University
Jack Harris, Arizona State University
Eduardo Medina, Auburn University
Michael Tobin, University of Oregon
Sarah Verschoor, Indiana University

The $1,000 Award for Best Article of the Year went to Michael Tobin, University of Oregon;
Best Reporting Technique Award of $1,000 went to Caroline Anders, Indiana University.
Those awards were selected from the monthly writing competition entries.

Three finalists in the Photojournalism Championship, who will each receive $1,500 scholarships
(listed in alphabetical order):
Liz Moughon, Ohio University
Nicole Neri, Arizona State University
Gabriel Scarlett, Western Kentucky University

Both the $1,000 Award for Best Portfolio and the Single Photo Award of $1,000 went to Alex Kormann, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Those awards were selected from the semi-final portfolios.

Two finalists in the Radio Broadcast News Championship, who will each receive $1,500 scholarships (listed in alphabetical order):
Aviva Okeson-Haberman, University of Missouri
Austin Westfall, Arizona State University

The $1,000 Award for Best Use of Radio for News Coverage went to Brighton McConnell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This award was selected from the monthly radio entries.

Two finalists in the Television Broadcast News Championship, who will each receive $1,500 scholarships (listed in alphabetical order):
Grace King, University of Florida
Meredith Sheldon, University Florida

The Best Use of Television for News Coverage Award of $1,000 went to Bryce Newberry, Arizona State University. This award was selected from the semi-final entries.

Two finalists in the Multimedia Championship, who will receive $1,500 scholarship (listed in alphabetical order):
Mackenzie Behm, University of Florida
Kathryn Ziesig, Western Kentucky University

The $1,000 Award for Best Multimedia Story of the Year went to Skyler Ballard, Western Kentucky University. This award was selected from the monthly competition entries.

The writing judges were: Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, The San Francisco Chronicle; Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; and David Zeeck, former President and Publisher, The News Tribune, WA.

The photojournalism judges were: Erin Lubin, Freelance Photographer, San Francisco; Dai Sugano, Staff Photographer/Senior Multimedia Editor, The Mercury News; and Jose Luis Rios, Director of Photography, San Antonio Express-News.

The radio and television judges were: Julie Chin, News Director, KNX Radio, CA; Lloyd Siegel, former Vice President of News Partnerships, NBC News, NY; and Fred Young, retired Senior Vice President of News, Hearst Television Inc, Yardley, PA.

The multimedia Judges were: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, The Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant, CA; Brian Storm, Founder & Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation was established by its namesake in 1948 under California non-profit laws, exclusively for educational and charitable purposes. Since then, the Hearst Foundations have contributed over 1 billion dollars to numerous educational programs, health and medical care, human services and the arts in every state.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program was founded in 1960 to foster journalism education through scholarships for outstanding college students. Since its inception, the program has distributed more than $13 million in scholarships and grants for the very best work by student journalists.

2018-19 Hearst Intercollegiate Winners Named

NATION’S JOURNALISM SCHOOLS WIN $89,000 IN HEARST PRIZES

SAN FRANCISCO – Eight universities shared prizes totaling $89,000 as this year’s winners of the Intercollegiate Writing, Photojournalism, Broadcast and Multimedia Competitions of the annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

The 2018-2019 prizes are awarded to the top universities in each division of the Intercollegiate Competitions, with the top ten of each category receiving Hearst trophies.

Often called “The Pulitzers of college journalism,” the Hearst program holds year-long competitions in writing, photojournalism, radio, television and multimedia for journalism undergraduates. Journalism schools accumulating the most points earned by their students in each category are designated the winners of the Intercollegiate Competitions.

The points earned by individual students in the monthly writing, photojournalism, radio, television and multimedia competitions determine each discipline’s Intercollegiate ranking. The winners are those schools with the highest accumulated student points in each category.

The Overall Intercollegiate winners are the schools with the highest accumulated student points from the 1,351 entries submitted this year in the writing, photojournalism, broadcast and multimedia competitions.

The 2019 Intercollegiate Competition winners are:

WRITING:
$10,000 First Place, Indiana University
$ 4,000 Second Place, Pennsylvania State University
$ 2,000 Third Place, Arizona State University

PHOTOJOURNALISM:
$10,000 First Place, Western Kentucky University
$ 4,000 Second Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
$ 2,000 Third Place, Ohio University

BROADCAST RADIO & TV:
$10,000 First Place, University of Florida
$ 4,000 Second Place, Arizona State University
$ 2,000 Third Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

MULTIMEDIA:
$10,000 First Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
$ 4,000 Second Place, Western Kentucky University
$ 2,000 Third Place, University of Nebraska – Lincoln

OVERALL:
$25,000 First Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, Arizona State University
Third Place, Pennsylvania State University

The winners in each category will receive cash prizes and trophies during the National Championships Intercollegiate Awards ceremony in San Francisco on June 4, 2019.

Intercollegiate Writing trophies are awarded to University of Maryland, fourth place; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, fifth place; University of Oregon, sixth place; University of Oklahoma, seventh place; Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, eighth place; Michigan State University, ninth place; University of Kentucky, tenth place-tie; University of Nebraska-Lincoln, tenth place-tie.

Intercollegiate Photojournalism trophies are awarded to: San Francisco State University, fourth place; University of Iowa, fifth place; Arizona State University, sixth place; Ball State University, seventh place; University of Nebraska – Lincoln, eighth place; University of Oregon, ninth place; University of Kentucky, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Broadcast Radio & TV trophies are awarded to: University of Missouri, fourth place; Pennsylvania State University, fifth place; Syracuse University, sixth place; University of Maryland, seventh place; University of Texas at Austin, eighth place; Elon University, ninth place; University of Nevada, Reno, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Multimedia trophies are awarded to: Arizona State University, fourth place; University of Florida, fifth place; Pennsylvania State University, sixth place; University of Montana, seventh place; Temple University, eighth place; University of Missouri, ninth place; University of South Carolina, tenth place.

Overall Intercollegiate trophies are awarded to: University of Florida, fourth place; Western Kentucky University, fifth place; University of Nebraska-Lincoln, sixth place; University of Missouri, seventh place; Indiana University, eighth place; University of Maryland, ninth place; University of Montana, tenth place.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program operates under the auspices of the accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication. It is fully funded and administered by The William Randolph Hearst Foundation. Currently, 104 accredited undergraduate schools of journalism in the United States are eligible to participate in the program, which awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually. The Intercollegiate Awards have been acknowledged since the inception of the program, and in 1990 monetary awards were added to the Hearst Journalism Awards Program budget.

Publisher William Randolph Hearst established the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and The Hearst Foundation, Inc. in the 1940’s, a few years before his death in 1951. Since then, the Foundations have awarded over one billion dollars in grants and programs.

2019 Hearst National Championship Finalists Selected

2019 HEARST NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP FINALISTS ANNOUNCED

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation has announced the 29 journalism students from across the country who will compete in the 59th annual National Writing, Photojournalism, Radio, Television and Multimedia Championships held in San Francisco, June 1 – June 6, 2019.

The finalists include eight writing finalists, six photojournalism finalists, five radio finalists, five television finalists and five multimedia finalists chosen from the monthly competitions, selected from a record 1,351 entries received this year. At the Championships, the finalists will participate in various spot assignments chosen by our judges, competing for additional scholarship awards ranging from $1,500 to $10,000.

The 2019 National Championship Finalists:

WRITING FINALISTS
Caroline Anders, Indiana University
James Crabtree-Hannigan, University of Maryland
Laurel Demkovich, Indiana University
Lydia Gerike, Indiana University
Jack Harris, Arizona State University
Eduardo Medina, Auburn University
Michael Tobin, University of Oregon
Sarah Verschoor, Indiana University

PHOTOJOURNALISM FINALISTS
Alex Kormann, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Liz Moughon, Ohio University
Nicole Neri, Arizona State University
Josephine Norris, Central Michigan University
Gabriel Scarlett, Western Kentucky University
James Wooldridge, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

RADIO FINALISTS
Megan Cain, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Dolores Hinckley, University of Florida
Brighton McConnell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Aviva Okerson-Haberman, University of Missouri
Austin Westfall, Arizona State University

TELEVISION FINALISTS
David Jones, University of Florida
Grace King, University of Florida
Matt Lively, Arizona State University
Bryce Newberry, Arizona State University
Meredith Sheldon, University of Florida

MULTIMEDIA FINALISTS
Skyler Ballard, Western Kentucky University
Mackenzie Behm, University of Florida
Abby Cantrell, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Darian Murphy Woehr, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kathryn Ziesig, Western Kentucky University

Presently, 104 colleges and universities with accredited undergraduate journalism schools are eligible to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards Program. Funded and administered for 59 years by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Journalism Program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships, grants and stipends annually.

2018-19 Hearst Multimedia IV – Team Reporting/ News Winners Named

HEARST MULTIMEDIA TEAM REPORTING/NEWS COMPETITION WINNERS NAMED

The top ten winners in the 2018-2019 college multimedia team reporting/news are announced in the 59th
annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program.

There were 80 team entries from 49 schools received in this competition.

First Place has been awarded to team members from Western Kentucky University: Gabriel Scarlett and Skyler Ballard, for their entry titled “The Wrongful Imprisonment of Jose Luis Garcia” published in WPUJ.com. They will receive a $3,000 scholarship.

Western Kentucky University’s School of Journalism receives a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners. There is no Championship component to this competition.

Other winning multimedia teams:
Second place, $2,000 award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill team members:
Kaitlin Harlow and Rob Gourley

Third place, $1,500 award, Western Kentucky University team members:
Morgan Hornsby and Gabriel Scarlett

Fourth place, $1,000 award, Temple University team members:
Jenny Roberts, Julie Christie, Sydney Schaefer, Austin Ampeloquio, Laura Smythe, Matthew McCann,
Larry O’Connor, Nico Rossi, Valerie McIntyre, Emily Scott, Grace Shallow, and Michaela Winberg

Fifth place, $1,000 award, University of Nebraska-Lincoln team members:
Gabriella Parson, Merika Andrade, Emily Case, Marcella Mercer, Elsie Stormberg, Matthew Walsh and Bill Wendl

Sixth place, Elon University team members:
Emmanuel Morgan, Maya Eaglin, Meagan Lynn and Carter Rayburn

Seventh place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill team members:
Alex Kormann, Hanna Davison, Alexis Fairbanks, Kaitlin Harlow, MaryRachel Bulkeley, and
Danielle Chemtob

Eighth place, Arizona State University team members:
Claire Cleveland, Carly Henry, and Lerman Montoya

Ninth place, University of Florida team members:
Grace King, Rachel Tate, Sofia Millar, Taylour Marks, Devoun Cetoute, Maria Roberts, Quan (McWil) Nguyen, Meryl Kornfield, Meryl Kornfield, Hasley Pitman, Meredith Sheldon, Jonathan Santos

Tenth place, Florida International University team members:
Lizandra’ Portal, Kirsten Cabarcas, Jessica Grioua, Monique Abbadie, Jennifer Suarez, Vivian Acosta
Cassandra Cabal, Carmen de Armas, Grecia Lastra, Amanda Leon, Maria Zeppenfeldt, Annabelle Santos, Nicholas Almeida, and Carina Vo

First Place, $10,000 Award in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition goes to University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with the highest accumulated student points from the four multimedia competition held this year.
Second Place: Western Kentucky University, $4,000 Award
Third Place: University of Nebraska-Lincoln, $2,000 Award
Fourth Place: Arizona State University
Fifth Place: University of Florida
Sixth Place: Pennsylvania State University
Seventh Place: University of Montana
Eighth Place: Temple University
Ninth Place: University of Missouri
Tenth Place: University of South Carolina

The top three winners will receive their awards at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation in San Francisco during the National Championships in June. The fourth-through-tenth place winners receive trophies for their placement.

The Multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant, CA; Brian Storm, Founder & Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 59th year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Breaking News Writing Winners Named

HEARST BREAKING NEWS WRITING WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college breaking news writing are announced in the 59th annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 104 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate. There were 93 entries from 55 schools received in the
final writing competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Caroline Anders, a sophomore from Indiana University.
Caroline receives a $3,000 scholarship for her winning article titled “Barge resigns as Monroe County
commissioner amid harassment accusations” published in Idsnews.com.

Caroline has also qualified to participate in the National Writing Championship held in San Francisco this June.

The journalism departments of all scholarship winners receive matching grants.

Second-to-tenth place winners:

Leah Brennan, University of Maryland, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Brian Muñoz, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, third place, $1,500 scholarship
James Crabtree-Hannigan, University of Maryland, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Sarah Price, Pennsylvania State University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship
Anton Delgado, Elon University, sixth place, certificate of merit
Megan Menchaca, University of Texas at Austin, seventh place, certificate of merit
Kal Weinstein, Virginia Commonwealth University, eighth place, certificate of merit
Tea Kvetenadze, New York University, ninth place, certificate of merit
Nick Hazelrigg, University of Oklahoma, tenth place, certificate of merit

Indiana University has won the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the five writing competitions of the year.

They are followed by: Pennsylvania State University; Arizona State University; University of Maryland; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Oregon; University of Oklahoma; Southern Illinois University, Carbondale; Michigan State University; University of Kentucky (tie); University of Nebraska-Lincoln (tie).

The top three winning schools earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively which will be presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation this June in San Francisco. The top ten schools earn Hearst trophies.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, The San Francisco Chronicle; Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; and David Zeeck, former President and Publisher, The News Tribune, WA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one radio, two television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2018-19 Hearst Personality/Profile Writing Winners Named

HEARST PERSONALITY/PROFILE WRITING WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college profile writing were announced today in the 59th annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 104 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

There were 118 entries from 68 schools received in the fourth writing competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Ethan Bauer, from University of Florida. Ethan receives a $3,000 scholarship for his winning article titled “Jumping Through Hoops: The story of Andrew Fava and Mak Krause” published in the Independent Florida Alligator.

Ethan was a spring 2018 graduate, and per program guidelines is not eligible to participate in the 2019 Championship. Second-place winner Jack Harris, a junior from Arizona State University, advances to participate in the National Writing Championship held in San Francisco this June. Jack receives a $2,000 scholarship for his winning story ” Apple of his eye: Children inspire visually impaired runner after lifetime of heartache” published in the Cronkite News.

The journalism departments of all scholarship winners receive matching grants.

Third-to-tenth place winners:

Kaitlin Edquist, Indiana University, third place, $1,500 scholarship

Anna Bauman, University of Oklahoma, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship

Matt Schmucker, Michigan State University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship

Austin Anderson, Iowa State University, sixth place, certificate of merit

Jonathan Leblanc, Michigan State University, seventh place, certificate of merit

Alli Davis, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, eighth place, certificate of merit

Cailyn Derickson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, ninth place, certificate of merit

Mamie Lomax, Middle Tennessee State University, tenth place, certificate of merit

Indiana University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first four writing competitions of the year. They are followed by: Arizona State University; Pennsylvania State University; University of Maryland; University of Oregon; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Kentucky (tie); University of Nebraska-Lincoln (tie); University of Florida; Auburn University.

The final intercollegiate writing winners will be announced after the completion of the five writing competitions and presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation in San Francisco this June.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, The San Francisco Chronicle; Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; and David Zeeck, former President and Publisher, The News Tribune, WA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one radio, two television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2018-19 Hearst Multimedia Enterprise Reporting Winners Named

HEARST MULTIMEDIA III/ENTERPRISE REPORTING WINNERS NAMED 

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia/Enterprise Reporting Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 72 entries from 41 schools submitted in the third
multimedia competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to Skyler Ballard, a senior from Western Kentucky University. Skyler will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “En Muerto En Vida” published in Wkupj.com. Skyler also qualifies to participate in the National Multimedia Championship which will be held in San Francisco, June 1-6, 2019.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Kristin E. Stitzlein, University of South Carolina
Third place, $1,500 award, Sam Reiser, Pennsylvania State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Gabriella Parsons, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Daria Kadovik, Arizona State University
The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Alex Kormann, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Seventh Place, certificate, Darian Woehr, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Eighth Place, certificate, Jiakai Lou, University of Montana
Ninth Place, certificate, Brook Joyner, Western Kentucky University
Tenth Place, certificate, Nicole Harvey, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill placed first in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the three multimedia competitions held this year.   It is followed by: University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Western Kentucky University, University of Florida; Arizona State University;
Pennsylvania State University; University of Montana; University of Missouri (tie); University of South Carolina (tie); Brigham Young University (tie); San Francisco State University (tie).

The final top three intercollegiate winners will be announced in May after the completion of the last multimedia competition.  They will receive $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively at the Intercollegiate Awards Ceremony during the National Championship this June in San Francisco.

The Multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant, CA; Brian Storm, Founder & Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 59th year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The
program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Television News Winners Named

HEARST TELEVISION TWO/NEWS WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Television News Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. The winners were selected from 76 entries submitted from 42 schools nationwide.

First Place has been awarded to David Jones from University of Florida. David wins a $3,000 scholarship and automatically qualifies for the National Television Championship, which will be held in San Francisco this June.

The other top four winners in this competition, along with the top finalists from Television Competition One/Features will submit additional entries for a semi-final round of judging. Finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the Championship, along with writing, photo, radio and multimedia finalists.

The top four semi-finalists:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Storme Jones, University of Oklahoma
Third Place, $1,500 award, Mary Grace Scully, University Florida
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Bryce Newberry, Arizona State University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Emily Wakeman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

Sixth-through tenth place winners:
Sixth Place, certificate, Gabriella Bachara, Arizona State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Austin Kleber, University of Maryland
Eighth Place, certificate, Blake Sammann, University of Missouri
Ninth Place, certificate, Sydney Persing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Tenth Place, certificate, Brandon Pelter, Pennsylvania State University

University of Florida has won the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the one radio and two television competitions.

It is followed by: Arizona State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Missouri; Pennsylvania State University; Syracuse University; University of Maryland; University of Texas, Austin; Elon University; University of Nevada-Reno.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. These awards will be presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation in San Francisco this June.

The television judges are: Julie Chin, News Director, KNX Radio, Los Angeles, CA; Lloyd Siegel, former Vice President of News Partnerships, NBC News, NY; and Fred Young, retired Senior Vice President of News, Hearst Television Inc., Yardley, PA.

The 59th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, added broadcast news to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, one radio, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2018-19 Hearst Sports Writing Winners Named

2018-19 HEARST SPORTS WRITING WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college sports writing were announced today in the 59th annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 104 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

There were 135 entries from 76 schools received in the third writing competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Cody Nagel, from University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Cody receives a $3,000
scholarship for his winning article titled “Why Are Female Athletes Some of the Best Students on Campus?”
published in Hailvarsity.com.

Cody was a spring 2018 graduate, and per program guidelines is not eligible to participate in the 2019
Championship. Second-place winner Sarah Verschoor, Indiana University, advances to participate in the National Writing Championship held in San Francisco this June. Sarah receives a $2,000 scholarship for her winning story “A racist trustee’s name was taken off an IU gym. Supporters want Bill Garrett’s name on it to right history”
published in the Indiana Daily Student.

The journalism departments of all scholarship winners receive matching grants.

Third-to-tenth place winners:

Jed May, University of Georgia, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Ryan Clarke, Arizona State University, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Patrick Burns, Pennsylvania State University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship
Anthony Poisal, Ohio University, sixth place, certificate of merit
Andy Kostka, University of Maryland, seventh place, certificate of merit
Ross Burkhart, University of Texas at Austin, eighth place, certificate of merit
Haley Kim, Syracuse University, ninth place, certificate of merit
Hannah Hoffmeister, University of Missouri, tenth place, certificate of merit

Indiana University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first three writing competitions of the year. They are followed by: Pennsylvania State University;
Arizona State University; University of Oregon; Auburn University (tie); University of Maryland (tie);
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; University of Missouri; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill;
University of Nebraska-Lincoln (tie); Southern Illinois University, Carbondale (tie).

The final intercollegiate writing winners will be announced after the completion of the five writing competitions and presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation in San Francisco this June.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, The San Francisco Chronicle; Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; and David Zeeck, former President and Publisher, The News Tribune, WA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one radio, two
television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2018-19 Hearst Photojournalism II Winners Named

HEARST PHOTOJOURNALISM COMPETITION II WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Photojournalism II– Picture Story/Series Competition of the 2018-2019 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

The winners were selected from 86 entries submitted from 51 schools nationwide. In a recent addition to the program guidelines, the first-place winner automatically qualifies for the National Photojournalism Championship which will be held in San Francisco next June. The other top winners in this competition, along with the top finalists from the photo I competition, will submit additional photographs for the semi-final round of judging in April.
Finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Championships, along with writing, radio, television and multimedia finalists.

First Place has been awarded to Alex Kormann from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Alex wins a $3,000 scholarship and qualifies for the National Championships.

Other top winners who qualify for the semi-final round:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Joel Angel Juárez, San Francisco State University
Third Place, $1,500 award, Liz Moughon, Ohio University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Cheyenne Thorpe, University of Oregon
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, James Wooldridge, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Michelle Hanks, Western Kentucky University
Seventh Place, certificate, Michael Blackshire, Western Kentucky University
Eighth Place, certificate, Nic Antaya, Michigan State University
Ninth Place, certificate, Chamberlain Smith, University of Georgia
Tenth Place, certificate, Blake Nissen, Ohio University

Western Kentucky University has won the 2018-19 Intercollegiate Photojournalism Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the two photo competitions held this year.

It is followed by: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ohio University; San Francisco State University;
University of Iowa; Arizona State University; Ball State University; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of Oregon; University of Kentucky. The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The photojournalism judges are: Erin Lubin, Freelance Photographer, San Francisco; Dai Sugano, Staff Photographer/Senior Multimedia Editor, The Mercury News; and Jose Luis Rios, Director of Photography,
San Antonio Express-News.

The 59th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, added photojournalism to the competitions in 1970. The program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.