2020-21 Hearst Sports Writing Winners Announced

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college sports writing have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 103 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate. There were 123 sports writing entries submitted from 67 universities in our third writing competition of this academic year.

First Place has been awarded to  Caleb Coffman, a senior from Indiana University. Caleb receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning article titled “The General’s Shadow: How author John Feinstein survived a year with Bob Knight ” published in the Indiana Daily Student. Caleb also qualifies to participate in the 2021 Hearst National Writing Championship this June.

Indiana University’s Department of Journalism will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Other scholarship winners are:
Luke Mullin, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Allison Ingrum, Syracuse University, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Natalie Parks, University of Kentucky, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Michael Gutnick, Arizona State University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship

The sixth-through-tenth place winners earn Hearst certificates:
Max Baker, University of Missouri, sixth place, certificate
Parth Upadhyaya, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, seventh place, certificate
Adam Cole, University of Missouri, eighth place, certificate
Drake Keeler, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, ninth place, certificate
Joe Levin, University of Texas at Austin, tenth place, certificate

Syracuse University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first three of five writing competitions held this year.

They are followed by: Drake University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Indiana University, University of Kentucky, Arizona State University, University of Florida, Brigham Young University.

The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of all five writing competitions in June. The top three winning schools will earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Journalist-at-large, ESPN’s The Undefeated; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor, Houston Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and
four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

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2021 Hearst Audio News & Features Winners Announced

San Francisco – The Hearst Foundation has announced the finalists selected in the 2020-2021 Journalism Awards Program’s Audio News and Features competition. The top radio winners qualify for the National
Championship, held this June, along with qualifying television, writing, photojournalism and multimedia finalists. 55 entries from 36 universities were submitted in this competition.

The top audio winners who qualify for the National Championship:
First Place, $3,000 award, Caleb Suggs, University of Memphis
Second Place, $2,000 award, Jaeha Joshua Chang, University of Southern California
Third Place, $1,500 award, Natalie Saenz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Charlotte Ix, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Emma VandenEinde, Arizona State University

The schools of all award-winning finalists receive matching grants.
Audio Finalists:
Sixth Place, Certificate, Hannah Bullard, Murray State University
Seventh Place, Certificate, Tina Turner, University of Alabama
Eighth Place, Certificate, Anthony Montalto, University of Florida
Ninth Place, Certificate, Eli Finkelson, Hofstra University
Tenth Place, Certificate, Dominique Lavigne, University of Texas at Austin

University of Florida has placed first in the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the Audio and TV 1 Competitions.
They are followed by: University of Texas at Austin; Michigan State University; Syracuse University; Murray State University; Arizona State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Howard University (tie); University of Memphis (tie); University of Nebraska-Lincoln (tie).
Final intercollegiate scores will be announced after the TV 2 competition has been finalized. The top three winning schools earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The audio competition judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television, NY; Holly Quan, Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio, CA; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensem & Rovitto LLC, PA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program also includes five writing, one audio, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.

The 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.

There are 103 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Explanatory Reporting Winners Announced

HEARST EXPLANATORY REPORTING WINNERS ANNOUNCED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college explanatory reporting have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 103 undergraduate journalism
programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

107 explanatory reporting entries from 60 universities were received in this competition.

First Place has been awarded to Riley Haun, from the University of Idaho. Riley receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning article titled “‘The bottom has just dropped out’: As insect populations plummet, scientists
wonder why.” published in the Spokeman.com. Riley also qualifies to participate in the 2021 Hearst National
Writing Championship this June.

University of Idaho’s School of Journalism will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Other scholarship winners are:

Angela Roberts, University of Maryland, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Drew Wayland, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Bailey Vandiver, University of Kentucky, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Ramishah Maruf, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship
Ashley Flaws, Drake University, sixth place, certificate
Emily Kelleher, Syracuse University, seventh place, certificate
Erika Peters, Stony Brook University, eighth place, certificate
Adrianna Jacobs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, ninth place, certificate
Claire Colby, University of Missouri, tenth place, certificate

Drake University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first two writing competitions this year.
They are followed by: Syracuse University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Florida; University of Oregon (tie); University of Oklahoma (tie);
Stony Brook University; University of Idaho; Brigham Young University; University of Iowa.

The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the five writing competitions in June. The top three winning schools in each category will earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor, Houston Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2020-21 Hearst Multimedia Narrative Storytelling Winners Announced

HEARST MULTIMEDIA NARRATIVE STORYTELLING WINNERS ANNOUNCED

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Narrative Storytelling Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 90 entries from 51 schools submitted in the first of four multimedia competitions held this academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Nash Consing, a senior from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Nash will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece “To My Future Employer.” Nash also qualifies to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Multimedia Championship which will be held this June.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Jing Feng, New York University
Third place, $1,500 award, Raj Paul Ghusar, San Francisco State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Jacob Moscovitch, University of Missouri
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Madeline Kraft, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Silas Walker, Western Kentucky University
Seventh Place, certificate, Mackenzie Behm, University of Florida
Eighth Place, certificate, Elsie Stormberg, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Ninth Place, certificate, Michelle Hanks, Western Kentucky University
Tenth Place, certificate, Sadie Brown, University of North Texas

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is in first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first of four multimedia competitions.
They are followed by: Western Kentucky University; University of Missouri; New York University; San Francisco State University; University of Florida; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of North Texas; Syracuse University; California State University, Northridge.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the all four multimedia competitions in May.

The multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today, VA; Meredith Hogan, Founder and Director, Blue Heron Media, WA.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 61st year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Television Features Winners Announced

HEARST TELEVISION FEATURES WINNERS NAMED

San Francisco – The William Randolph Hearst Foundation announces the top 10 winners in 2020-2021 Television Features Competition in the 61st Annual Hearst
Journalism Awards Program, in which 103 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

The winners were selected from 97 entries submitted from 63 schools nationwide in the first of two television competitions.

First Place has been awarded to Joe Freihofer, a senior from Michigan State University. Joe wins a $3,000
scholarship and automatically qualifies for the National Television Championship which will be held in June 2021.

The other top ten finalists and their awards are:

Second Place, $2,000 award, Annabel Thorpe, University of Missouri
Third Place, $1,500 award, Luke Hajdasz, University of Connecticut
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Sydney Wicker, Colorado State University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Piper Cassetto, Murray State University
Sixth Place, certificate, Chris O’Brien, University of Florida
Seventh Place, certificate, Joseph Carson, Brigham Young University
Eighth Place, certificate, Marco Ramirez, University of Texas at Austin
Ninth Place, certificate, Jack Hirsh, Pennsylvania State University
Tenth Place, certificate, Gianna DaPra, Kent State University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The following four finalists qualify for the semi-final round:
Annabel Thorpe, University of Missouri
Luke Hajdasz, University of Connecticut
Sydney Wicker, Colorado State University
Piper Cassetto, Murray State University

These finalists along with the top four from the second television competition will be chosen to participate in the semi-final round. From that competition, four finalists will compete in the National Broadcast Championships.

Michigan State University is in first place in the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest
accumulated student points from the first of three broadcast competitions.

It is followed by: University of Florida; University of Texas at Austin; University of Missouri; University of Connecticut; Kent State University; Howard University (tie); Colorado State University (tie); Syracuse University (tie); Murray State University (tie).

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively, and will be announced after the completion of the audio and second television competition in April.

The television judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television, NY; Holly Quan, Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio, CA; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensem & Rovitto LLC, PA.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program also includes five writing, one audio, two photo, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.

The 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. There are 103 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Photojournalism I Winners Announced

HEARST  PHOTOJOURNALISM I WINNERS  ANNOUNCED

San Francisco – The Hearst Foundation announces the winners in the Photojournalism Features and News
Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. The winners in first photo competition of the year were selected from 117 entries submitted from 65 universities nationwide.

First Place and a $3,000 scholarship has been awarded to Silas Walker from Western Kentucky University. Silas graduated in May 2020 and per program guidelines is not eligible to participate in the Championship. The second-place winner, Nate Swanson from Ohio University, receives a $2,000 award and qualifies for the 2021 Championship.

The other top winners in this competition, along with the top finalists in the next photo competition, will submit additional photographs for the semi-final round of judging next April.  Finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the National Championship, along with writing, audio, television and multimedia finalists.  

The qualifiers for the semi-final round:
Third Place, $1,500 award, Chris Kohley, Western Kentucky University   
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Alexandria Skowronski, Ohio University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award,  Hope Davison, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Sixth Place, certificate, Noah Riffe, Pennsylvania State University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The seventh-through-tenth place finalists are:
Seventh Place, certificate, Kenneth Ferriera, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Eighth Place, certificate, Sara Diggins, University of Montana
Ninth Place, certificate, Michael Clubb, University of Kentucky
Tenth Place, certificate, Christopher Day, University of Florida

Western Kentucky University  is in first place in the  Intercollegiate Photojournalism Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first of two photo competitions held this year.
It is followed by:
Ohio University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (tie); University of Kentucky (tie); University of Montana; Pennsylvania State University; University of Florida; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Arizona State University;
Kent State University.  

The final Intercollegiate winners will be announced after the Photo II competition in April. The top three
intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The photojournalism judges are: Marcia Allert, Director of Visual Journalism, The Dallas Morning News; Luis Rios,
Director of Photography, San Antonio Express-News; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant.

The 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added photojournalism to the competitions in 1970.  The
program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.  There are 103 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Feature Writing Winners Announced

HEARST FEATURE WRITING WINNERS ANNOUNCED

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college feature writing have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, in which 103 undergraduate journalism programs at universities across the nation are eligible to participate.

150 feature writing entries from 79 universities were received in this competition.

First Place has been awarded to Madeleine Davison, from Syracuse University. Madeleine receives a $3,000 scholarship for her winning article titled “How Sports Culture Undermines Athletes Long After They Graduate” published in The 61% Project.

Syracuse University’s School of Journalism will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Madeleine Davison and Lorien MacEnulty were May 2020 graduates and per program guidelines, are not eligible to participation in the National Writing Championship. Katie Ann McCarver,  University of Iowa, qualifies to
participate in the 2021 Hearst National Writing Championship.

Other scholarship winners are:
Lorien MacEnulty,  Drake University, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Katie Ann McCarver,  University of Iowa, third place, $1,500 scholarship (Championship qualifier)
Anton Delgado,  Elon University, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Tatyana Tandanpolie,  New York University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship
Eduardo Medina,  Auburn University, sixth place, certificate
Hannah Nuss,  Drake University, seventh place, certificate
Stephany Matat,  University of Florida, eighth place, certificate
George Stoia, University of Oklahoma, ninth place, certificate
Paula Kiley, California State University, Long Beach, tenth place, certificate

Drake University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first of five writing competitions this year.
They are followed by: Syracuse University; University of Florida; University of Iowa; Elon University;
New York University (tie); Auburn University (tie); University of Oklahoma; University of Oregon;
California State University, Long Beach.

The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the five writing competitions in June.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Senior Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor, Houston Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2020 Hearst National Championship Winners Announced

60th Annual Hearst National Championship 
Winners Announced

Winning college journalists in the National Writing, Photojournalism, Radio, Television and Multimedia
Championships were announced on June 5, 2020 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards
Program.

The Hearst Championships are the culmination of the 2019 – 2020 Journalism Awards Program, which were held in 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs. From May 29 – June 4, 2020, 29 finalists – winners from the 14 monthly competitions – participated in the 60th annual Hearst Championships.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the in-person Championship planned for Houston, Texas was replaced by a virtual event. Finalists met their judges and received their assignments over video-conference meetings, then produced and submitted their pieces from home.

Following are the winners and the scholarships they received:

National Writing Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Caroline Anders, Indiana University
Second Place, $7,500 award: Hannah Denham, Washington and Lee University
Third Place, $5,000 award: George Stoia, University of Oklahoma

Writing Championship runner-ups listed in alphabetical order:
Matt Cohen, Indiana University, $1,500 award
David Eckert, Pennsylvania State University, $1,500 award
Jack Harris, Arizona State University, $1,500 award
Jordan Miller, University of Oklahoma, $1,500 award
Sasha Urban, University of Southern California, $1,500 award

National Photojournalism Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Michael Swensen, Ohio University
Second Place, $7,500 award: Katina Zentz, University of Iowa
Third Place, $5,000 award: Kenneth Ferriera, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Photo Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Nic Antaya, Michigan State University, $1,500 award
Nathaniel Bailey, Kent State University, $1,500 award
Lily Thompson, Western Kentucky University, $1,500 award

National Radio Broadcast News Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Annabeth Poe, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, $7,500 award: Sofia Mingote, University of Florida
Third Place, $5,000 award: Jared Weber, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Radio Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Jonah Hrkal, Arizona State University, $1,500 award
Allie Snow, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, $1,500 award

National Television Broadcast News Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Payton Tysinger, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, $7,500 award: Dylan McKim, Arizona State University
Third Place, $5,000 award: Cambria Haro, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Television Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Spencer Humphrey, University of Missouri, $1,500 award
Valerie Lyons, University Florida, $1,500 award

National Multimedia Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Jiakai Lou, University of Montana
Second Place, $7,500 award: Mackenzie Behm, University of Florida
Third Place, $5,000 award: Colin Davy, Syracuse University

Multimedia Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Neda Karimi, Stony Brook University, $1,500 award
Lucas Pruitt, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $1,500 award

Special Awards
$1,000 award for Best Article of the Year went to Hannah Denham, Washington and Lee University.
$1000 award for Best Reporting Technique went to Sasha Urban, University of Southern California.
Those awards were selected from the monthly writing competition entries.

$1,000 award for Best Single Photo from the Semi-Final Portfolio when to Lily Thompson,
Western Kentucky University.
$1,000 award for Best Single Photo from the Championship Assignment went to Michael Swensen,
Ohio University.

$1,000 Award for Best Use of Radio for News Coverage went to Allie Snow, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
This award was selected from the monthly radio entries.

$1,000 Award for Best Use of Television for News Coverage went to Cambria Haro, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This award was selected from the semi-final entries.

$1,000 Award for Best Multimedia Story of the Year went to Colin Davy, Syracuse University. This award was
selected from the monthly competition entries.

The writing judges were: Audrey Cooper, Editor in Chief, The San Francisco Chronicle; Dwayne Bray, Senior
Coordinating Producer/Enterprise Reporting Unit, ESPN; and Larry Kramer, Retired President and Publisher, USA Today.

The photojournalism judges were: Carolyn Cole, Foreign National Photo Correspondent, Los Angeles Times;
Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant; Sue Morrow, Editor, News Photographer Magazine; Luis Rios, Director of Photography, San Antonio Express-News.

The radio and television judges were: Candy Altman, retired Vice President News, Hearst Television; Julie Chin, News Director, KNX Radio; Mary Lynn Roper, retired President and General Manager, KOAT-TV; and Fred Young,
retired Senior Vice President of News, Hearst Television.

The multimedia Judges were: Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today; Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer; Brian Storm, Founder, Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation was established by its namesake in 1948 under California non-profit laws, exclusively for educational and charitable purposes. Since then, the Hearst Foundations have contributed over 1 billion dollars to numerous educational programs, health and medical care, human services and the arts in every state.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program was founded in 1960 to support, encourage and give assistance to journalism education through scholarships for outstanding college students. Since its inception, the program has
distributed more than $14 million in scholarships and grants for the exceptional work by student journalists who participate in the program.

2020 Hearst Intercollegiate Winners Announced

2019-2020 Hearst Journalism Awards Intercollegiate Winners Announced

Nation’s Journalism Schools win $89,000 in prizes

SAN FRANCISCO – Five universities shared prizes totaling $89,000 as this year’s winners of the Intercollegiate Writing, Photojournalism, Broadcast and Multimedia Competitions of the annual Hearst Journalism Awards
Program.

The 2019-2020 prizes are awarded to the top universities in each division of the Intercollegiate Competitions, with the top ten of each category receiving Hearst trophies.

Often called “The Pulitzers of college journalism,” the Hearst program holds year-long competitions in writing, photojournalism, radio, television and multimedia for journalism undergraduates. The points earned by individual students in these monthly competitions determine each discipline’s Intercollegiate ranking. The winners are those schools with the highest accumulated student points in each category.

The Overall Intercollegiate winners are the schools with the highest accumulated student points from the record 1,396 entries submitted this year in the writing, photojournalism, radio, television and multimedia competitions.

The 2020 Intercollegiate Competition winners are:

INTERCOLLEGIATE WRITING:

$10,000 First Place, Arizona State University
$ 4,000 Second Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
$ 2,000 Third Place, University of Oklahoma

INTERCOLLEGIATE PHOTOJOURNALISM:

$10,000 First Place, Western Kentucky University
$ 4,000 Second Place, Arizona State University
$ 2,000 Third Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

INTERCOLLEGIATE BROADCAST RADIO & TV:

$10,000 First Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
$ 4,000 Second Place, Arizona State University
$ 2,000 Third Place, University of Florida

INTERCOLLEGIATE MULTIMEDIA:

$10,000 First Place, Western Kentucky University
$ 4,000 Second Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
$ 2,000 Third Place, University of Florida

INTERCOLLEGIATE OVERALL:

$25,000 First Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, Western Kentucky University
Third Place, Arizona State University

Intercollegiate Writing trophies are awarded to:
Syracuse University, fourth place; Pennsylvania State University, fifth place; University of Missouri, sixth place;
Indiana University, seventh place-tie; University of Maryland, seventh place-tie; University of Southern California, ninth place; Oklahoma State University, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Photojournalism trophies are awarded to:
Michigan State University, fourth place; University of Nebraska-Lincoln, fifth place; Ohio University, sixth place; University of Missouri, seventh place; Kent State University, eighth place; University of Montana, ninth place; Ball State University, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Broadcast Radio & TV trophies are awarded to:
University of Missouri, fourth place; Syracuse University, fifth place; Pennsylvania State University, sixth place; Kent State University, seventh place; University of Colorado, eighth place; University of Kansas, ninth place; Michigan State University, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Multimedia trophies are awarded to:
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, fourth place; University of Missouri, fifth place; University of Montana, sixth place; Syracuse University, seventh place; Elon University, eighth place; Arizona State University, ninth place; Stony Brook University, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Overall trophies are awarded to: University of Florida, fourth place; University of Missouri, fifth place; Syracuse University, sixth place; Pennsylvania State University, seventh place; University of
Nebraska-Lincoln, eighth place; University of Oklahoma, ninth place; University of Montana, tenth place.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program operates under the auspices of the accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication. It is fully funded and administered by The William Randolph Hearst Foundation. Currently, 104 accredited undergraduate schools of journalism in the United States are eligible to participate in the program, which awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

The Intercollegiate Awards have been acknowledged since the inception of the program, and in 1990 monetary awards were added to the Hearst Journalism Awards Program budget.

Publisher William Randolph Hearst established the William Randolph Hearst
Foundation and The Hearst Foundation, Inc. in the 1940’s, a few years before his death in 1951. Since then, the Foundations have awarded over one billion dollars in grants and programs.

2020 Hearst Team Multimedia Digital News/Enterprise Competition Winners Named

Hearst Team Multimedia Digital News/Enterprise Competition Winners Named

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Team Multimedia Digital News/Enterprise Story Competition of the 60th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 79 entries from 49 schools submitted in the fourth and final multimedia competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to Team Sofie Mortensen and Sara Krog from Western Kentucky University. They will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “A Wounded Soldier”.

The second-through-fifth place winners receive awards and the journalism department of those winners receive matching grants. There is no championship component for this competition.

Second Place, $2,000 Award: University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Team Members: Isaiah Somanas, Sabrina Sommer, Jessica Moore, Maddie Washburn, Peyton Stoike and
Ken Ferriera

Third Place, $1,500 Award: Western Kentucky University
Team Members: Lydia Schweickart, Ella Corder, BreAnna Luker, Grace Pritchett, Nic Huey, Dalton Puckett,
Emily Moses, Michelle Hanks

Fourth Place, $1,000 Award: University of Florida
Team Members: Tessa Bentulan, Henry Coburn, Dolores Hinckley, Alexis Howard, Grace King, Sky Lebron,
Daniella Mora, Sofia Millar, Claudia Perez Brito, Camille Respress, Lauren Reynolds, Maria Roberts, Matt Serna,
Meredith Sheldon, Raymon Troncoso

Fifth Place, $1,000 Award: University of Missouri
Team Members: Amanda Lee, Armond Feffer, Rebecca Ferguson, Joel Green, Julia Hansen, Yanran Huang,
Yehyun Kim, Sam Koeppel, Amanda Lee, Jamie Maron, Jacob Moscovitch, Matt McCabe, Liv Paggiarino,
Tristen Rouse, Daniel Shular

Sixth Place: University of North Carolina At Chapel Hill
Team Members: Haley France, Zayrha Rodriguez

Seventh Place: University of North Carolina At Chapel Hill
Team Members: Tenley Garrett, Peggy Mullen

Eighth Place: University of Mississippi
Team Members: Devna Bose, Brittany Brown, Christian Johnson, Hayden Benge

Ninth Place: Arizona State University
Team Members: Nicole Ludden, Julian Hernandez, Meg Potter, Erica Figueroa

Tenth Place: Syracuse University
Team Members: Rachel Day, Molly Bolan, Audrey Lee, Kristine Klein, Taylor Bradford, Katie Intner, Patrick Linehan, Kathryn Pirzadeh, Jake Smith, Lauren Steckley, Nadia Suleman, Kelsey Thompson, Ari Wodarcyk

Western Kentucky University receives first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the four multimedia competitions held this academic year.

They are followed by:

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, second place
University of Florida, third place
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, fourth place
University of Missouri, fifth place
University of Montana, sixth place
Syracuse University, seventh place
Elon University, eighth place
Arizona State University, ninth place
Stony Brook University, tenth place

The final intercollegiate winners in all categories will be announced this week. The top three intercollegiate
winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively,

The multimedia judges are: Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today; Danese Kenon, Director of Video & Photograph, Philadelphia Inquirer; Brian Storm, Founder,
Executive Producer, MediaStorm.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 60th year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The
program also includes five writing, one radio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.