2021 Hearst Intercollegiate Winners Announced

SAN FRANCISCO – This year’s winners of the Intercollegiate Writing, Photojournalism, Audio and Television and Multimedia Competitions of the annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program share $89,000 in awards.

The 2020-2021 prizes are awarded to the top universities in each division of the Intercollegiate Competitions, with the top ten of each category receiving Hearst trophies.

Often called “The Pulitzers of college journalism,” the Hearst program holds year-long competitions in writing, photojournalism, audio, television and multimedia for journalism undergraduates. The points earned by individual students in these monthly competitions determine each discipline’s Intercollegiate ranking. The winners are those schools with the highest accumulated student points in each category.

The Overall Intercollegiate winners are the schools with the highest accumulated student points from the 1,325 entries submitted this year in the writing, photojournalism, audio, television and multimedia competitions.

The 2021 Intercollegiate Competition winners are:

INTERCOLLEGIATE WRITING:
$10,000 First Place, Syracuse University

$4,000 Second Place, Indiana University

$2,000 Third Place, Arizona State University

INTERCOLLEGIATE PHOTOJOURNALISM:
$10,000 First Place, Western Kentucky University

$4,000 Second Place, Ohio University

$2,000 Third Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

INTERCOLLEGIATE AUDIO & TELEVISION:
$10,000 First Place, University of Florida

$4,000 Second Place, Arizona State University

$2,000 Third Place, Michigan State University

INTERCOLLEGIATE MULTIMEDIA:
$10,000 First Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

$4,000 Second Place, Western Kentucky University

$2,000 Third Place, San Francisco State University

INTERCOLLEGIATE OVERALL:
$25,000 First Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, University of Florida
Third Place, Western Kentucky University

Intercollegiate Writing trophies are awarded to:
 University of Florida, fourth place; University of Oklahoma, fifth place; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, sixth place; Drake University, seventh place; University of Nebraska-Lincoln, eighth place; Brigham Young University, ninth place; Pennsylvania State University, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Photojournalism trophies are awarded to:
 University of Montana, fourth place; University of Kentucky, fifth place; Ball State University, sixth place-tie; Pennsylvania State University, sixth place-tie; University of Oregon, eight place; University of Florida, ninth place; Syracuse University, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Audio and Television trophies are awarded to:
 University of Missouri, fourth place; Syracuse University, fifth place; University of Texas, Austin, sixth place; Kent State University, seventh place-tie; Pennsylvania State University, seventh place-tie; Murray State University, ninth place; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Multimedia trophies are awarded to:
 University of Florida, fourth place; University of Missouri, fifth place; Stony Brook University, sixth place; Arizona State University, seventh place; Elon University, eighth place-tie; Syracuse University, eighth place-tie; University of Montana, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Overall trophies are awarded to:

Fourth Place, Syracuse University; Fifth Place, Arizona State University; Sixth Place, University of Missouri; Seventh Place, Pennsylvania State University; Eighth Place, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Ninth Place, Ohio University; Tenth Place, University of Kentucky.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program operates under the auspices of the accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication. It is fully funded and administered by The William Randolph Hearst Foundation. Currently, 104 accredited undergraduate schools of journalism in the United States are eligible to participate in the program, which awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

The Intercollegiate Awards have been acknowledged since the inception of the program, and in 1990 monetary awards were added to the Hearst Journalism Awards Program budget.

Publisher William Randolph Hearst established the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and The Hearst Foundation, Inc. in the 1940’s, a few years before his death in 1951. Since then, the Foundations have awarded over one billion dollars in grants and programs.

# # #

2021 Hearst National Championship Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winning college journalists in the National Writing, Photojournalism, Audio, Television and Multimedia Championships were announced on June 14, 2021 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program.

The Hearst Championships are the culmination of the 2020 – 2021 Journalism Awards Program, which were held in 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs. From June 4 – June 11, 2021, 29 finalists – winners from the 14 monthly competitions – participated in the 61st annual Hearst Championships.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Championships were held virtually once again. Finalists met their judges and received their assignments over Zoom meetings, then produced and submitted their pieces from home on deadline. The winners were announced at the live-broadcast awards ceremony on Monday, June 14, 2021.

Following are the winners and the scholarships they received:

National Writing Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Melissa Manno, Pennsylvania State University
Second Place, $7,500 award: Riley Haun, University of Idaho
Third Place, $5,000 award: Caleb Coffman, Indiana University

Writing Championship runner-ups listed in alphabetical order:
Katie Ann McCarver, University of Iowa, $1,500 award
Luke Mullin, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, $1,500 award
Gabe Stern, Syracuse University, $1,500 award

National Photojournalism Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Alie Skowronski, Ohio University
Second Place, $7,500 award: Rebecca Slezak, Ball State University
Third Place, $5,000 award: Angelica Edwards, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Photo Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Chris Kohley, Western Kentucky University, $1,500 award
Isaac Ritchey, Central Michigan University, $1,500 award
Nate Swanson, Ohio University, $1,500 award

National Audio Broadcast News Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Caleb J. Suggs, University of Memphis
Second Place, $7,500 award: Emma VandenEinde, Arizona State University
Third Place, $5,000 award: Charlotte Ix, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Audio Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Jaeha Joshua Chang, University of Southern California, $1,500 award
Natalie Saenz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, $1,500 award

National Television Broadcast News Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Joe Freihofer, Michigan State University
Second Place, $7,500 award: Annabel Thorpe, University of Missouri
Third Place, $5,000 award: Katelyn Keenehan, Arizona State University

Television Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Alyssa Jackson, University Missouri, $1,500 award
Chris O’Brien, University of Florida $1,500 award

National Multimedia Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Hope Davison, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, $7,500 award: Victor Prieto, University of Florida
Third Place, $5,000 award: Kate DeBlasis, University of Maryland

Multimedia Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Nathaniel Josh Zaldarriga Consing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, $1,500 award
Sam Mallon, Western Kentucky University, $1,500 award

Special Awards:
$1,000 award for Best Article of the Year went to Gabe Stern, Syracuse University.
$1000 award for Best Reporting Technique went to Caleb Coffman, Indiana University.
Those awards were selected from the monthly writing competition entries.

$1,000 award for Best Single Photo went to Angelica Edwards, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
$1,000 award for Best Portfolio went to Isaac Ritchey, Central Michigan University.
Those awards were selected from the semi-Final photo competition.

$1,000 Award for Best Use of Audio for News Coverage went to Natalie Saenz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This award was selected from the monthly audio entries.

$500 Award each for Best Use of Television for News Coverage went to Alyssa Jackson, University of Missouri and Annabel Thorpe, University of Missouri. These awards were selected from the semi-final entries.

$1,000 Award for Best Multimedia Story of the Year went to Hope Davison, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This award was selected from the monthly competition entries.

Championship Judges
Writing judges: Dwayne Bray, Journalist-at-large, ESPN’s The Undefeated; Larry Kramer, Retired President and Publisher, USA Today, Maria Reeve, Managing Editor, Content, Houston Chronicle.

Photojournalism judges: Luis Rios, Director of Photography, San Antonio Express-News; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant; Marcia Allert, Director of Visual Journalism, Dallas Morning News.

Audio and television judges: Candy Altman, retired Vice President News, Hearst Television; Holly Quan, Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensen & Rovitto LLC.

Multimedia judges: Danese Kenon, Managing Editor, Visuals, Philadelphia Inquirer; Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios.

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation was established by its namesake in 1948 under California non-profit laws, exclusively for educational and charitable purposes. Since then, the Hearst Foundations have contributed over 1 billion dollars to numerous educational programs, health and medical care, human services and the arts in every state.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program was founded in 1960 to support, encourage and give assistance to journalism education through scholarships for outstanding college students. Since its inception, the program has distributed more than $14 million in scholarships and grants for the exceptional work by student journalists who participate in the program.

# # #

2020-21 Hearst Team Multimedia Digital News or Enterprise Story Competition Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Team Multimedia Digital News or Enterprise Story Competition of the 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 83 entries from 48 schools submitted in the fourth and final multimedia competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to the team from Western Kentucky University: Michelle Hanks, Nic Huey, Silas Walker, Emily Moses, Grace Pritchett, Phoebe Alcala, Chase Sheehan Breanna Luke, Hayley Watson, Dalton Puckett, Madihah Abri, Megan Strassweg, Katie Stratman. They will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “These Days”.

The first-through-fifth place winners receive awards with matching grants going to their journalism departments. There is no Championship component for this competition.

Second Place, $2,000 award: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Team Members: Sarah Redmond, Caroline Almy, Veronica Correa, Haley France, Malin Curry

Third Place, $1,500 award: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Team Members: Nash Consing, Hope Davison, Molly Horak, Halynna Snyder, Taylor Tyson

Fourth Place, $1,000 award: University of Missouri

Team Members: Jacob Moscovitch, Daffy Liu, Lia Waldrum

Fifth Place, $1,000 award: San Francisco State University 

Team Members: Christopher Ramirez, Sebastian Mino-Bucheli, Eve DeBord, Kyran Berlin, Ari Arciaga, Samantha Laurey, Dan Dejesus

Sixth Place: Certificate, Western Kentucky University

Team Members: Sam Mallon, Fatimah Alhamdin, Grace Bailey, Raaj Banga, Morgan Bass, Gabi Broekema, Alex Driehaus, Kennedy Gott, Morgan Hornsby, Missy Johnson, Cassady Lamb, Sam Mallon, Vonn Pillman, Rachel Taylor, Lily Estella Thompson

Seventh Place: Certificate, West Virginia University 

Team Members: Patrick Orsagos, Jeffrey McCullough, Hunter Bennett, Molly DeCarli, Camrynn Tanner, Rylee McNemar, Penny De La Cruz

Eighth Place: Certificate, Middle Tennessee State University
Team Members: Morgan Gonzalez, Christyn Allen, Cheyana Avilla, Dontae Rucker, Haley Perkins, Zoe Haggard, Xavier Mastin, Dede West, and Danesia Hunt

Ninth Place: Certificate, University of Connecticut

Team Members: Alethea Kavarnos, Jacob Rodier, Judah Shingleton, Colm O’Reilly, Meg Williams, Kara Murray, Isaac Bilmes, Sophia Pelletier, Yuanyuan Cao, Daniela Luna,
Yuhan Ma, Jake Roberts

Tenth Place: Certificate, University of Florida

Team Members: Camille Respess, Anneliese Linder, Meleah Lyden, Quan McWil, Gabriella Mercurio, Sofia Mingote, Anthony Montalto, Kristin Moorehead, Audrey Mostek, Chris O’Brien, Madison Soriano

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill receives first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the four multimedia competitions held this academic year.

They are followed by:
Western Kentucky University, second place
San Francisco State University, third place
University of Florida, fourth place
University of Missouri, fifth place
Stony Brook University, sixth place
Arizona State University, seventh place
Elon University, eighth place tie
Syracuse University, eighth place tie
University of Montana, tenth place
The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively,

The multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today, VA; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios, WA.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 61styear, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The Program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 104 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2021 Hearst Championship Qualifiers Announced

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation has announced the 29 journalism students representing 20 universities from across the country who will compete in the 61st annual National Writing, Photojournalism, Audio, Television and Multimedia Championships, June 5 – 14, 2021.

The finalists include eight writing finalists, six photojournalism finalists, five audio finalists, five television finalists and five multimedia finalists, selected from 1,325 entries received in this year’s 14 monthly competitions.

During the Championships, the finalists will participate in various spot assignments selected by our judges, competing for scholarship awards ranging from $1,500 to $10,000. The Championships will be held virtually again this year.

We congratulate the 2021 National Championship Finalists.

Writing Finalists:

Caleb Coffman, Indiana University
Sydnee Gonzalez, Brigham Young University
Riley Haun, University of Idaho
Melissa Manno, Pennsylvania State University
Katie Ann McCarver, University of Iowa

Luke Mullin,  University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Natalie Parks, University of Kentucky
Gabriel Stern, Syracuse University

Photojournalism Finalists:

Angelica Edwards, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
Chris Kohley, Western Kentucky University 
Isaac Ritchey, Central Michigan University 
Alie Skowronski, Ohio University 
Rebecca Slezak, Ball State University 
Nate Swanson, Ohio University 

Audio Finalists:

Jaeha Joshua Chang, University of Southern California

Charlotte Ix,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
 
Natalie Saenz,  University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Caleb Suggs, University of Memphis

Emma VandenEinde, Arizona State University

Television Finalists:

Joe Freihofer, Michigan State University

Alyssa Jackson, University of Missouri
Katelyn Keenehan, Arizona State University

Chris O’Brien, University of Florida
Annabel Thorpe, University of Missouri

Multimedia Finalists:

Nash Consing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Hope Davison, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kate DeBlasis, University of Maryland
Sam Mallon, Western Kentucky University
Victor Prieto, University of Florida

Presently, 104 colleges and universities with accredited undergraduate journalism schools are eligible to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards Program. Funded and administered for 61 years by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Journalism Program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships, grants and stipends annually.

2020-21 Hearst Investigative Reporting Winners Announced

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college Investigative Reporting have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program.

There were 78 entries submitted from 47 universities in the fifth and final writing competition of this
academic year.

First Place has been awarded to  Gabriel Stern, a senior from Syracuse University. Gabriel receives a $3,000 scholarship for the article “In New York prisons, widespread package room complaints go unresolved”
published in The Daily Orange. Gabriel also qualifies for the Writing Championship in June 2021.

Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners. Gabriel also qualifies for the Writing Championship in June 2021.

Other scholarship winners are:
Sydnee Gonzalez, Brigham Young University, second place, $2,000 scholarship
Valentina Palm, Florida International University, third place, $1,500 scholarship
Rose Wagner, Loyola University New Orleans, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship
Emily Isaacman, Indiana University, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship

The sixth-through-tenth place winners earn Hearst certificates:


Sofia James, University of Southern California, sixth place, certificate
Kevin Pirehpour, Arizona State University, seventh place, certificate
Rachel Crumpler,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, eighth place, certificate
Jana Hayes, University of Oklahoma, ninth place, certificate
Natalie Parks,  University of Kentucky, tenth place, certificate

Syracuse University has won the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the five writing competitions held this year.

They are followed by: Indiana University; Arizona State University; University of Florida; University of Oklahoma; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Drake University; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Brigham Young University; Pennsylvania State University.

The top three winning schools will earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Journalist-at-large, ESPN’s The Undefeated; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor/Content, Houston Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and
four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2020-21 Hearst Multimedia Digital News or Enterprise Story Competition Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Digital News or Enterprise Story Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

There were 74 entries from 44 schools submitted in the third multimedia competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Hope Davison, from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Hope receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “What’s next, Japan?”
Hope also qualifies to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Multimedia Championship which will be held this June.

The other top finalists are:

Second place, $2,000 award, Victor Prieto, University of Florida
Third place, $1,500 award, Lydia Schweickart, Western Kentucky University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Hazel Cramer,  University of Montana
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, David M. Horowitz, San Francisco State University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:

Sixth Place, certificate, Alexandra Accorsi, Pennsylvania State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Andrew Dundas, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Eighth Place, certificate, Harika Maddala, San Francisco State University
Ninth Place, certificate, Alex Maxwell, Western Kentucky University
Tenth Place, certificate, Elizabeth Pulver, Stony Brook University

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is in first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first three multimedia competitions.
 They are followed by: Western Kentucky University; San Francisco State University; University of Florida; Stony Brook University; Syracuse University; University of Missouri; Elon University; Arizona State University; University of Maryland (tie); University of Montana (tie).

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the all four multimedia competitions in May.

The multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA; Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today, VA; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios, WA.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 61st year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Personality/Profile Writing Winners Announced

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college Personality/Profile Writing have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program.

There were 114 profile writing entries submitted from 64 universities in our fourth writing competition of this
academic year.

First Place has been awarded to  George Stoia, a spring 2020 graduate from the University of Oklahoma. George receives a $3,000 scholarship for the article “Courageous: The Maggie Nichols Story” published in the 
OU Daily.

University of Oklahoma’s College of Journalism & Mass Communication will receive a matching grant, as do the journalism departments of all scholarship winners.

Per program guidelines, George is not eligible to participate in the 2021 Championships as he is a spring 2020 graduate.

Second-place winner Melissa Manno, a junior from Pennsylvania State University, receives a $2,000
scholarship and qualifies for the Writing Championship in June 2021 for her article “The Inmates’ Reality” published in The Lion’s Roar.

Other scholarship winners are:


Michaela Mulligan, University of Florida, third place, $1,500 scholarship

Lilly St. Angelo, Indiana University, fourth place, $1,000 scholarship

Sadie Brown, University of North Texas, fifth place, $1,000 scholarship

The sixth-through-tenth place winners earn Hearst certificates:

Jake Santo, Arizona State University, sixth place, certificate

Olivia Wales, Texas Christian University, seventh place, certificate

Matt Courson, Middle Tennessee State University, eighth place, certificate

Rachel Bernstein, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, ninth place, certificate

Jamie Landers, Arizona State University, tenth place, certificate

Syracuse University placed first in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first four of five writing competitions held this year.
They are followed by: Indiana University; Arizona State University; Drake University; University of Florida; University of Oklahoma; Pennsylvania State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Missouri;
University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of all five writing competitions in June. The top three winning schools will earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

Judging the writing competitions this year are: Dwayne Bray, Journalist-at-large, ESPN’s The Undefeated; Larry Kramer, retired President and Publisher, USA Today; and Maria Reeve, Managing Editor/Content, Houston
Chronicle.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

The 14 monthly competitions consist of five writing, two photojournalism, one audio, two television and
four multimedia, with Championship finals in all divisions. The program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

2020-21 Hearst Television News Winners Announced

San Francisco – The top 10 winners in college Television News have been announced in the 61st annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program.The winners were selected from 77 entries submitted from 48 schools nationwide in the second television competition of this academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Katelyn Keenehan, a senior from Arizona State University. Katelyn wins a $3,000 scholarship and automatically qualifies for the National Television Championship, which will be held in June 2021.

The second through fifth-place finalists are:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Tyler Manion, Arizona State University
Third Place, $1,500 award, Joseline Donoso, University of Florida
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Chris O’Brien, University of Florida
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Alyssa Jackson, University of Missouri

These finalists, along with the four finalists from the first television competition, qualify to participate in a semi-final round. From that semi-final round, four finalists will be selected to compete in the National Championships, along with the two first place winners in TV and the writing, audio, television and multimedia finalists.

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth through tenth-place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Sam Britten, Michigan State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Ian Gilmour, Michigan State University
Eighth Place, certificate, Addison Albert, Pennsylvania State University
Ninth Place, certificate, John Webb, University of Idaho
Tenth Place, certificate, Ward Jolles, University of South Carolina

The University of Florida has won the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated
student points from the radio and two television competitions held this year.

It is followed by: Arizona State University; Michigan State University; University of Missouri; Syracuse University; University of Texas, Austin; Kent State University (tie); Pennsylvania State University (tie); Murray State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The television judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television, NY; Holly Quan,
Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio, CA; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensem & Rovitto LLC, PA.

The 61st annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends annually.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass
Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Photojournalism II Winners Announced

San Francisco – The Hearst Foundation announces the winners in the Photojournalism Picture Story/Series
Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. The winners in the second photo competition of the year were selected from 91 entries submitted from 54 universities nationwide.

First place has been awarded to Angelica Edwards, a junior from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Angelica receives a $3,000 scholarship award and qualifies for the 2021 Photojournalism Championship which will take place this June.

Second place, $2,000 scholarship, is awarded to Michael Blackshire from Western Kentucky University. Michael is a summer 2020 graduate and, per program guidelines, is not eligible for the semi-final round.

The other top winners in this competition, along with the top finalists from the Photo I competition, will submit additional photographs for the semi-final round of judging in April. Four finalists will be selected from that round to compete in the National Championships, along with writing, audio, television and multimedia finalists.

The qualifiers for the semi-final round:

Third Place, $1,500 award, Sam Mallon, Western Kentucky University

Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Austin Johnson, University of Oregon

Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Isaac Ritchey, Central Michigan University

Sixth Place, certificate, Leslie Ostronic, Ohio University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The seventh-through-tenth place finalists are:

Seventh Place, certificate, Rebecca Slezak, Ball State University

Eighth Place, certificate, Julia Nikhinson, University of Maryland

Ninth Place, certificate, Eloise Kelsey, San Francisco State University

Tenth Place, certificate, Laura Bilson, Ohio University

Western Kentucky University has won the Intercollegiate Photojournalism Competition with the highest
accumulated student points from the two photo competitions held this year.

It is followed by: 
Ohio University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Montana; University of Kentucky; Ball State University (tie); Pennsylvania State University (tie); University of Oregon; University of Florida; Syracuse University.

The top three Intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively.

The photojournalism judges are: Marcia Allert, Director of Visual Journalism, The Dallas Morning News; Luis Rios, Director of Photography, San Antonio Express-News; Mark Morris, Independent Visual Consultant.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program added photojournalism to the competitions in 1970. The program also
includes five writing, one audio, two television, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.


The 61st Annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program is conducted under the auspices of accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication and fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation.  103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst
competitions.

2020-21 Hearst Multimedia Innovative Storytelling & Audience Engagement Competition Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Innovative Storytelling & Audience
Engagement Competition of the 2020-2021 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 49 entries from 34 schools submitted in the second multimedia competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Alex Kim, from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Alex receives a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “Superhuman.” Alex is a spring 2020 graduate and, per program guidelines, is not eligible to participate in the Championship.

Second-place winner, Kate DeBlasis, from the University of Maryland, earns a $2,000 award and qualifies to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards National Multimedia Championship which will be held this June.

The other top finalists are:

Third place, $1,500 award, Sam Mallon, Western Kentucky University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Chris Kohley,  Western Kentucky University

Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Marjorie Anne Foster, Elon University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:

Sixth Place, certificate, Matthew Westmoreland, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Seventh Place, certificate, Christian Cangiano, Stony Brook University

Eighth Place, certificate, Denisse Machado Taboada, Florida International University
Ninth Place, certificate, Jennifer Alvarez, Arizona State University
Tenth Place, certificate, Sam Ogozalek, Syracuse University

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is in first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first two multimedia competitions.
They are followed by: Western Kentucky University; University of Missouri; Syracuse University; San Francisco State University; Stony Brook University; University of Maryland; University of Florida; New York University; Elon University.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of the all four multimedia competitions in May.

The multimedia judges are: Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer, PA;
Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today, VA; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios, WA.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 61st year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 103 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are
eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.