2023-24 Hearst Audio Competition Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the 2023-2024 Hearst Journalism Awards Program’s Audio News/Features Competition. There were 70 entries from 41 universities submitted in this competition.

Five audio winners qualify for the National Championships in June, along with qualifying television, writing,
photojournalism and multimedia finalists.

The top audio winners are:
First Place, $3,000 award, Sierra Pfeifer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, $2,000 award, Henry Taylor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Third Place, $1,500 award, Jonah Krueger, Ohio University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Yaw Bonsu, Hofstra University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Ronnie Parrillo, Syracuse University
The schools of the top five award-winning finalists receive matching grants.

The five finalists who qualify for the 2024 National Audio Championship this June are:
Sierra Pfeifer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Henry Taylor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Yaw Bonsu, Hofstra University
Ronnie Parrillo, Syracuse University
Kai Williams, University of Montana

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Kai Williams, University of Montana
Seventh Place, certificate, Amelia Bridges, Louisiana State University
Eighth Place, certificate, Tessa Kresch, Michigan State University
Ninth Place, certificate, Halle Jackson, University of Missouri
Tenth Place, certificate, Sophia Holm, University of Nevada, Reno

Syracuse University leads in first place in the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the Television One and Audio Broadcast Competitions held this year.
They are followed by: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Florida; University of Missouri;
Pennsylvania State University; Arizona State University; University of Maryland; Ohio University;
Hofstra University (tie); University of Montana (tie); University of Nebraska-Lincoln (tie).

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively, and will be announced after the completion of the second television competition in April.

The audio judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television; Holly Quan, Reporter
/Anchor, KCBS Radio; Jeff Bartlett, retired President and General Manager, WMUR-TV.

The 64th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. There are 105 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

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2023-24 Hearst Explanatory Reporting Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Explanatory Reporting Competition of the 2023-2024 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.
There were 123 entries from 74 schools submitted in the second writing competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Alan Halaly, a senior from University of Florida. Alan will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning article “When the Storm Hits” published in WUFT.org. Alan is not able to participate in the Hearst National Writing Championship.

The second-place winner Sinclair Holian, a senior from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill qualifies for the National Championship. Sinclair will receive a $2,000 award for the winning article “Land Loss and Legacy on Historic Black-owned Farmland.”

The other top finalists are:
Third place, $1,500 award, David Blakeley, San Francisco State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Mika Travis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Madison Powers, Elon University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Angelique Gingras, University of Maryland
Seventh Place, certificate, Amanda McCard, University of Connecticut
Eighth Place, certificate, Jack O’Connor, University of Minnesota
Ninth Place, certificate, Alexis Weisend, University of Oregon
Tenth place, certificate, Samuel Larreal, Florida International University

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is in first place in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the
highest accumulated student points from the first two writing competitions of the year. They are followed by: University of Florida; Drake University; Indiana University; Oklahoma State University; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Elon University; University of Minnesota (tie); Arizona State University (tie); San Francisco State University.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate
winners will be announced after the completion of all five writing competitions in May.

The writing judges are: Maria Reeve, Managing Editor/Vice President, The Star Tribune; Sue Campbell, Managing Editor, Features, The Star Tribune; David Callaway, Founder and Editor, Callaway Climate Insights.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 64th year, also includes two photojournalism, one audio, two
television, and four multimedia competitions. The program offers up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 105 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2023-24 Hearst Photo News & Features Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Photojournalism News and Features Competition of the 2023-2024 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.
The winners were selected from 113 entries from 66 schools submitted in the first photo competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to Owen Ziliak, a senior from University of Missouri.
Owen wins a $3,000 scholarship and qualifies for the National Photojournalism Championship in June 2024.

The top four finalists, along with finalists in the Photo II Competition, will submit additional photos for the semi-final round of judging.  Four finalists will be chosen from that round to compete in the Championship.

The finalists who qualify for the semi-final round are:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Dylan Thiessen, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Third Place, $1,500 award, Daniel J. Jacobi, Iowa State University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Audrey Richardson, Michigan State University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Anna Connors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

 The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Ayrton Breckenridge, University of Iowa
Seventh Place, certificate, Grace Smith, University of Iowa
Eighth Place, certificate, Kate Cassady, University of Missouri
Ninth Place, certificate, Benjamin Fanjoy, San Francisco State University
Tenth Place, certificate, Chad Cushing, University of Kansas

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is first place in the Intercollegiate Photojournalism
Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first photo competition. They are followed by: University of Missouri; University of Iowa; Michigan State University; Iowa State University; University of Kentucky;
San Francisco State University; University of Montana (tie); University of Oregon (tie); University of Kansas.

The final Intercollegiate winners will be announced after the Photo II competition results are tabulated. The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively, which will be presented during the National Championship in June.

The photojournalism judges are: Marcia Allert, Managing Photo Producer, Apple; Nicole Frugé, Director of Visuals, The San Francisco Chronicle; Danny Gawlowski, Assistant Managing Editor, The Seattle Times.

The 64th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program includes five writing, two photo, one audio, two television, and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends.  
Currently, there are 105 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2023-24 Hearst Multimedia Narrative Storytelling Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Narrative Storytelling competition of the 2023-2024 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.
There were 85 entries from 52 schools submitted in the first multimedia competition of the year.

First Place has been awarded to Murphy McFarlane, a senior from Syracuse University. Murphy will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning piece “Full Circle – A fourth generation of family farmers incorporate
sustainable practices in hopes of helping others better understand their source of food” and qualifies for the National Multimedia Championship which will be held this June in San Francisco.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Wendy Wang, Syracuse University
Third place, $1,500 award, Quincy Marks, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Katie Kriz, University of Missouri
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Serra Sowers, University of Florida

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Ali Niaz, Colorado State University
Seventh Place, certificate, Isaiah Dickerson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Eighth Place, certificate, David (Ka Wei) Cheung, New York University
Ninth Place, certificate, Grant Grubbs, University of Kentucky
Tenth Place, certificate, Ryan Connor, Colorado State University

Syracuse University is in first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first of four multimedia competitions.
They are followed by: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Colorado State University; University of Missouri; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of Florida; New York University; University of Kentucky; Arizona State University; Western Kentucky University.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate
winners will be announced after the completion of all four multimedia competitions in May.

The multimedia judges are: Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios; Danese Kenon, Director of Video and Photography, Philadelphia Inquirer; Robert Scheer, Visual Journalist, The Indianapolis Star.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 64th year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The
program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 105 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2023-24 Hearst Television Features Winners Announced

Hearst Television Features Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Television Features Competition of the 2023-2024 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 97 entries from 54 schools submitted in the first of two television competitions.

First Place has been awarded to John Perik, a senior from Syracuse University.
John wins a $3,000 award and qualifies for the National Television Championship which will be held in June 2024.

The second-through-fifth place finalists are:
Second Place, $2,000 award, Tabitha Bland, Arizona State University
Third Place, $1,500 award, Nicole Aponte, Syracuse University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Jackson Valenti, University of Missouri
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Thomas Isaacson, Colorado State University

These finalists along with the top four from the second television competition qualify for a semi-final round where they will submit additional entries. From that competition, four finalists will be chosen to compete in the National Television Championship.

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Kevin McNulty, University of Maryland
Seventh Place, certificate, Christopher Will, University of Florida
Eighth Place, certificate, Kevin R. Palomino, University of Oklahoma
Ninth Place, certificate, Hannah Markovich, Pennsylvania State University
Tenth Place, certificate, Daniel Stipanovich, Arizona State University

Syracuse University is in first place in the Intercollegiate Broadcast Competition with the highest accumulated student points from the first of three broadcast competitions.

They are followed by: Arizona State University; University of Florida; Pennsylvania State University; University of Missouri; University of Maryland; Colorado State University; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; University of Oklahoma; University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively, and will be announced after the completion of the audio and second television competition in April.

The television judges are: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television; Holly Quan,
Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio; Jeff Bartlett, retired President and General Manager, WMUR-TV.

The 64th annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program added broadcast journalism to the competitions in 1988. The program also includes five writing, two photojournalism and four multimedia competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. There are 105 universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

2023-24 Hearst Feature Writing Winners Announced

Hearst Journalism Awards Feature Writing Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Feature Writing Competition of the 2023-2024 Hearst Journalism Awards Program. There were 152 entries from 82 schools submitted in the first writing competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to Shelby Swanson, a junior from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Shelby will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning article “She saw her mother get murdered” published in Mediahub.

Shelby also qualifies to participate in the Hearst National Writing Championship which will be held in June 2024.

The other top finalists are:
Second place, $2,000 award, Lincoln Roch, Drake University
Third place, $1,500 award, CJ Younger, Drake University
Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Emma Uber, Indiana University
Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Ashton Slaughter, Oklahoma State University

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The sixth-through-tenth place finalists are:
Sixth Place, certificate, Alan Halaly, University of Florida
Seventh Place, certificate, Caroline Colvin, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Eighth Place, certificate, Kylie Williams, University of Florida
Ninth Place, certificate, Jackson McCoy, Ohio University
Tenth place, certificate, Sarah Walter, Texas Christian University

Drake University is in first place in the Intercollegiate Writing Competition with the highest accumulated student points in the first writing competition of the year.
 They are followed by: University of Florida; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Indiana University; Oklahoma State University; University of Nebraska-Lincoln; University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; Ohio University; Michigan State University; Texas Christian University.

The top three intercollegiate winners earn $10,000, $4,000 and $2,000 respectively. The final intercollegiate winners will be announced after the completion of all five writing competitions in May.

The writing judges are: Maria Reeve, Managing Editor/Vice President, The Star Tribune; Sue Campbell, Managing Editor, Features, The Star Tribune; David Callaway, Founder and Editor, Callaway Climate Insights.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 64th year, also includes two photojournalism, one audio, two television, and four multimedia competitions. The program offers up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 105 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to participate in the Hearst competitions.

2022 – 2023 Hearst Intercollegiate Winners announced

SAN FRANCISCO – This year’s winners of the Intercollegiate Writing, Photojournalism, Audio and Television and Multimedia Competitions of the annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program share $95,000 in awards. These awards will be presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation during the National Hearst Championship in San Francisco on Tuesday, June 6.

The 2022-2023 prizes are awarded to the top universities in each division of the Intercollegiate Competitions, with the top ten of each category receiving Hearst trophies. Often called “The Pulitzers of college journalism,” the Hearst program holds year-long competitions in writing, photojournalism, audio, television and multimedia for journalism undergraduates. The points earned by individual students in these monthly competitions determine each discipline’s Intercollegiate ranking. The winners are those schools with the highest accumulated student points in each category.

The Overall Intercollegiate winners are the schools with the highest accumulated student points from the 1,304 entries submitted this year in the writing, photojournalism, audio, television and multimedia competitions.

The 2023 Intercollegiate Competition winners are:

INTERCOLLEGIATE WRITING

$10,000 First Place, Pennsylvania State University
$4,000 Second Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
$2,000 Third Place, Indiana University

INTERCOLLEGIATE PHOTOJOURNALISM

$10,000 First Place, Western Kentucky University
$4,000 Second Place, University of Iowa
$2,000 Third Place, University of Oregon

INTERCOLLEGIATE AUDIO & TELEVISION
$10,000 First Place, University of Missouri
$4,000 Second Place, Syracuse University
$2,000 Third Place, University of Florida

INTERCOLLEGIATE MULTIMEDIA

$10,000 First Place – tie, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
$10,000 First Place – tie, Western Kentucky University
$2,000 Third Place, University of Florida

INTERCOLLEGIATE OVERALL
$25,000 First Place, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, University of Florida
Third Place, Western Kentucky University

Intercollegiate Writing trophies are awarded to: University of Florida, fourth place; University of Missouri, fifth place; University of Montana, sixth place; Arizona State University, seventh place; University of Iowa, eighth place; University of Maryland, ninth place; Ball State University, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Photojournalism trophies are awarded to: Michigan State University, fourth place; Ohio University, fifth place; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, sixth place; University of Florida, seventh place; Pennsylvania State University, eight place; Elon University, ninth place; University of Montana, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Audio and Television trophies are awarded to: University of Oklahoma, fourth place; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, fifth place; Arizona State University, sixth place; Pennsylvania State University, seventh place; University of Nebraska-Lincoln, eighth place; Hofstra University, ninth place; University of South Carolina, tenth place.

Intercollegiate Multimedia trophies are awarded to: University of Southern California, fourth place; Syracuse University, fifth place; University of Missouri, sixth place; Pennsylvania State University, seventh place; San Francisco State University, eighth place; Brigham Young University, ninth place-tie; Florida International University, ninth place-tie.

Intercollegiate Overall trophies are awarded to:
University of Missouri, fourth place; Pennsylvania State University, fifth place; Syracuse University, sixth place; Arizona State University, seventh place; University of Montana, eighth place; Indiana University, ninth place; University of Iowa, tenth place.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program operates under the auspices of the accredited schools of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication. Presently, 105 colleges and universities with accredited undergraduate journalism schools are eligible to participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards Program. Funded and administered for 63 years by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Journalism Program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships, grants and stipends annually.

The Intercollegiate Awards have been acknowledged since the inception of the program, and in 1990 monetary awards were added to the Hearst Journalism Awards Program budget.

Publisher William Randolph Hearst established the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and The Hearst Foundation, Inc. in the 1940’s, a few years before his death in 1951. Since then, the Foundations have awarded over one billion dollars in grants and programs.

2023 Hearst National Championship Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winning college journalists in the 63rd National Writing, Photojournalism, Audio, Television and Multimedia Championships were announced on June 7, 2023 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program. The Hearst Championships are the culmination of the 2022 – 2023 Journalism Awards Program, which were held in 105 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs.

The 30 Championship finalists were selected 1,304 entries submitted in the 14 monthly competitions this
academic year. From June 2 – 7, the finalists participated in the National Championships in San Francisco, where they demonstrated their writing, photography, audio, television, and multimedia skills in spot assignments. The assignments were chosen by media professionals who judged the finalists’ work throughout the year and at the Championships.

Following are the winners and the scholarships they received:

National Writing Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Anna Guber, University of Florida
Second Place, $7,500 award: Nicolas Napier, Indiana University
Third Place, $5,000 award: Griffen Smith, University of Montana

Writing Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Finalist, $1,500 award: Katherine Delk, University of Florida
Finalist, $1,500 award: Austin Hanson, University of Iowa
Finalist, $1,500 award: Eli Hoff, University of Missouri
Finalist, $1,500 award: Andrew Lwowski, Arizona State University
Finalist, $1,500 award: Alasdair McNinch, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

National Photojournalism Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Wesley Lapointe, University of Oregon
Second Place, $7,500 award: Laura Bilson, Ohio University
Third Place, $5,000 award: Kennedy Gott, Western Kentucky University

Photo Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Finalist, $1,500 award: Annie Barker, Michigan State University
Finalist, $1,500 award: J’sha Gift, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Finalist, $1,500 award Lauren Witte, University of Florida

National Audio Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Sophie Mallinson, U. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Second Place, $7,500 award: John Perik, Syracuse University
Third Place, $5,000 award: Brianna Atkinson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Audio Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Finalist, $1,500 award: Hallie Gutzwiller, University of Nebraska – Lincoln
Finalist, $1,500 award: Briana Heaney, University of Missouri

National Television Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Ophelie Jacobson, University of Florida
Second Place, $7,500 award: Nicole Aponte, Syracuse University
Third Place, $5,000 award: Rachel Henderson, University of Missouri

Television Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Finalist, $1,500 award: Cameron Joiner, University of Oklahoma
Finalist, $1,500 award: Julie Koharik, University of Missouri
Finalist, $1,500 award: Christopher Will, University of Florida

National Multimedia Championship
First Place, $10,000 award: Alexandra Schallert, Western Kentucky University
Second Place, $7,500 award: Angelina Katsanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Third Place, $5,000 award: Alexis Ashby, University of Florida

Multimedia Championship runners-up listed in alphabetical order:
Finalist, $1,500 award: Avery Lotz, University of Florida
Finalist, $1,500 award: Drake Presto, Arizona State University

Special Awards
$1,000 award for Best Article of the Year went to Eli Hoff, University of Missouri.
$1000 award for Best Reporting Technique went to Anna Guber, University of Florida.

Those awards were selected from the monthly writing competition entries.

$1,000 award for Best Single Photo from the Semi-Finals when to Leslie Ostronic, Ohio University.
$1,000 award for Best Portfolio from the Semi-Finals went to Annie Barker, Michigan State University.

$1,000 award for Best Use of Audio for News Coverage went to John Perik, Syracuse University. This award was selected from the monthly audio entries.
$1,000 award for Best Use of Television for News Coverage went to Julie Koharik, University of Missouri. This award was selected from the television semi-final entries.

$1,000 award for Best Multimedia Story of the Year went to Angelina Katsanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This award was selected from the monthly competition entries.

The writing judges were: Maria Reeve, Vice President – Editor for Content Initiatives for Hearst Texas; Sue Campbell, Editorial Director, AME/Features, Star Tribune Magazine; David Callaway, Founder and Editor, Callaway Climate Insights.

The photojournalism judges were:: Marcia Allert, Managing Photo Producer, Apple; Nicole Frugé, Director of Visuals, The San Francisco Chronicle; Danny Gawlowski, Assistant Managing Editor, The Seattle Times.

The audio and television judges were: Candy Altman, retired Vice President of News, Hearst Television; Holly Quan, Reporter/Anchor, KCBS Radio; Joe Rovitto, President, Clemensen & Rovitto LLC.

The multimedia Judges were: Jarrad Henderson, Independent Visual Journalist; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios; Robert Scheer, Visual Journalist, The Indianapolis Star.

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation was established by its namesake in 1948 under California non-profit laws, exclusively for educational and charitable purposes. Since then, the Hearst Foundations have contributed over 1 billion dollars to numerous educational programs, health and medical care, human services and the arts in every state.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program was founded in 1960 to support, encourage and give assistance to journalism education through scholarships for outstanding college students. Since its inception, the program has distributed more than $15 million in scholarships and grants for the exceptional work by student journalists who participate in the program.

2022-23 Hearst Multimedia Team Digital News/Enterprise Story Winners Announced

San Francisco – Winners have been announced in the Multimedia Team Digital News/Enterprise Story Team Competition of the 2022-2023 Hearst Journalism Awards Program.

There were 69 entries from 42 schools submitted in the fourth multimedia competition of the academic year.

First Place has been awarded to the team from the University of Southern California: Myrah Sarwar, Grace Yuan Gao, Halle Hazzard, Marta Hernani Fernandez, Rachel Kisela, Hannu Kivimaki, Charisma Madarang, Jesse Mechanic, Lajja Mistry, Jacqueline Pinedo, Sam Schwartz, Mallika Singh, Vaishnavi Vasudevan and Randy Vazquez.

The team will receive a $3,000 scholarship for the winning multimedia piece titled “Reflections of the L.A. Uprising.”

The other top finalists are:

Second Place, $2,000 award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:
Renata Schmidt, Alex Berenfeld, Abigail Pittman, Susie Webb

Third Place, $1,500 award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill:
J’sha Gift, Angelica Edwards, Chase Cofield, Jacob Turner

Fourth Place, $1,000 award, Western Kentucky University:
Sam Mallon and Jordan Matthis

Fifth Place, $1,000 award, Western Kentucky University:
Zane Meyer-Thornton and Addison LeBoutillier

Sixth Place, University of Florida:
Emily Palazzotto, Kendall Brandt, Alexus Cleavenger, Amy Galo, Macie Goldfarb,
Ophelie Jacobson, Christopher Will

Seventh Place, Syracuse University:
Emma Folts, Lucinda Strol, Chelsea Stern, Sydney Gold, Alex Battaglia, Sneha KC, Abigail Jones,
Ande Wittenmeier, Bond Demetri Photos, TJ Shaw, Yasmin Nayrouz, Andrew Crane,
Rebecca Lan, Olivia Swaab, Julia Walker, Morgan Tucker, Ashley Clemens, Wendy Wang, Lang Delapa

Eighth Place, Ohio University:
Joe Timmerman and Leslie Ostronic

Ninth Place, Florida International University:
Cornia Vera, Fatema Al Sakiti, Marian Estevez

Tenth Place, University of Missouri:
Lily Dozier, Anna Watson, Avery Maslowsky

The top five winning schools receive matching grants.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Western Kentucky University have tied for first place in the Intercollegiate Multimedia Competition, with the highest accumulated student points from the four multimedia competitions held this year.

They are followed by: University of Florida; University of Southern California; Syracuse University; University of Missouri; Pennsylvania State University; San Francisco State University; Brigham Young University (tie); Florida International University (tie).

These awards will be presented at the Intercollegiate Awards Presentation during the National Championships on June 6 in San Francisco.

The multimedia judges are: Jarrad Henderson, Senior Multimedia Producer – Investigative and Enterprise Video Team, USA Today; Meredith Hogan, Senior Creative Producer, Red Element Studios; Robert Scheer, Visual Journalist, The Indianapolis Star.

The Journalism Awards Program, now in its 63rd year, added multimedia to the competitions in 2010. The
program also includes five writing, one audio, two television, and two photojournalism competitions offering up to $700,000 in scholarships, matching grants and stipends. 105 member universities of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication with accredited undergraduate journalism programs are eligible to
participate in the Hearst competitions.

2023 Hearst Championship Qualifiers Announced

The William Randolph Hearst Foundation has announced the 30 journalism students representing 14 universities from across the country who will compete in the 63rd annual National Writing, Photojournalism, Audio, Television and Multimedia Championships, June 2-8, 2023.

The finalists include eight writing finalists, six photojournalism finalists, five audio finalists, six television finalists and five multimedia finalists, selected from 1,304 entries received in this year’s 14 monthly competitions.

During the Championships, held in San Francisco, the finalists will fulfill assignments selected by the program judges, competing for scholarship awards of up to $10,000.

We congratulate the 2023 National Championship finalists.

Writing Finalists
Katherine Delk, University of Florida
Anna Guber, University of Florida
Austin Hanson, University of Iowa
Eli Hoff, University of Missouri
Andrew Lwowski, Arizona State University
Alasdair McNinch, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Nicolas Napier, Indiana University
Griffen Smith, University of Montana

Photo Finalists
Annie Barker, Michigan State University
Laura Bilson, Ohio University
J’sha Gift, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kennedy Gott, Western Kentucky University
Wesley Lapointe, University of Oregon
Lauren Witte, University of Florida

Audio Finalists
Brianna Atkinson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Hallie Gutzwiller, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Briana Heaney, University of Missouri
Sophie Mallinson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
John Perik, Syracuse University

Television Finalists
Nicole Aponte, Syracuse University
Rachel Henderson, University of Missouri
Ophelie Jacobson, University of Florida
Cameron Joiner, University of Oklahoma
Julie Koharik, University of Missouri
Christopher Will, University of Florida

Multimedia Finalists
Alexis Ashby, University of Florida
Angelina Katsanis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Avery Lotz, University of Florida
Drake Presto, Arizona State University
Alexandra Schallert, Western Kentucky University

Presently, 105 colleges and universities with accredited undergraduate journalism schools are eligible to
participate in the Hearst Journalism Awards Program. Funded and administered for 63 years by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, the Journalism Program awards up to $700,000 in scholarships, grants and stipends annually.